Overlap of dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux in the general population: One disease or distinct entities?

R. S. Choung, G. R. Locke, C. D. Schleck, A. R. Zinsmeister, N. J. Talley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The overlap of dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is known to be frequent, but whether the overlap group is a distinct entity or not remains unclear. The aims of the study was to evaluate whether the overlap of dyspepsia and GER (dyspepsia-GER overlap) occurs more than expected due to chance alone, and evaluate the risk factors for dyspepsia-GER overlap. Methods In 2008 and 2009, a validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a total of 8006 community sample from Olmsted County, MN. Overall, 3831 of the 8006 subjects returned surveys (response rate 48%). Dyspepsia was defined by symptom criteria of Rome III; GER was defined by weekly or more frequent heartburn and/or acid regurgitation. Key Results Dyspepsia and GER occurred together more commonly than expected by chance. The somatic symptom checklist score was significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs GER alone or dyspepsia alone [OR=1.9 (1.4, 2.5), and 1.6 (1.2, 2.1), respectively]. Insomnia was also significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs. GER alone or dyspepsia alone [OR=1.4 (1.1, 1.7), OR=1.3 (1.1, 1.6), respectively]. Moreover, proton pump inhibitor use was significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs dyspepsia alone [OR=2.4 (1.5, 3.8)]. Conclusions & Inferences Dyspepsia-GER overlap is common in the population and is greater than expected by chance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-e106
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Dyspepsia
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Population-based study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

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