Outcomes of Patients With Cirrhosis Undergoing Orthopedic Procedures: An Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

Neehar D. Parikh, Yu Hui Chang, Elliot B. Tapper, Amit Mathur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The population of patients with cirrhosis is growing and shifting toward a more elderly demographic and thus are at risk of developing orthopedic complications. There is lack of data on safety of orthopedic procedures in this population. Methods: We performed an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2005 to 2011 for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, and spinal laminectomy/fusion, stratified by presence of cirrhosis. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality and secondary endpoints included length of stay (LOS) and costs. Results: There were 693,610 inpatient stays for orthopedic procedures conducted during the study period, with 3014 (0.43%) patients coded as having cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis had a lower median age (62 vs. 66 y; P<0.001) and were more likely to be male (52.3% vs. 41.1%; P<0.001). The inpatient mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis (2.4% vs. 0.4%; P<0.001) as was median LOS (4 vs. 3 d; P<0.001) and mean costs ($19,321 vs. $18,833; P<0.001). Patients with decompensated cirrhosis (vs. compensated cirrhosis) had significantly higher inpatient mortality rates (5.8% vs. 1.1%; P<0.001) with higher LOS and costs (P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, cirrhosis was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio, 4.22; 95% confidence interval, 2.92-6.10). Hospital cirrhosis volume was inversely associated with mortality, while hospital orthopedic procedure volumes had an inconsistent impact on outcomes. Conclusions: Inpatient orthopedic procedures in patients with cirrhosis result in high postoperative mortality, LOS, and costs. Careful patient selection is warranted to optimize cirrhosis patient postoperative outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 11 2018

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Orthopedic Procedures
Inpatients
Fibrosis
Length of Stay
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Hospital Mortality
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Spinal Fusion
Laminectomy
Arthroplasty
Patient Selection
Population
Orthopedics
Hip

Keywords

  • costs
  • LOS
  • THA
  • TKA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Outcomes of Patients With Cirrhosis Undergoing Orthopedic Procedures : An Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. / Parikh, Neehar D.; Chang, Yu Hui; Tapper, Elliot B.; Mathur, Amit.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 11.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Outcomes of Patients With Cirrhosis Undergoing Orthopedic Procedures: An Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample",
abstract = "Introduction: The population of patients with cirrhosis is growing and shifting toward a more elderly demographic and thus are at risk of developing orthopedic complications. There is lack of data on safety of orthopedic procedures in this population. Methods: We performed an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2005 to 2011 for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, and spinal laminectomy/fusion, stratified by presence of cirrhosis. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality and secondary endpoints included length of stay (LOS) and costs. Results: There were 693,610 inpatient stays for orthopedic procedures conducted during the study period, with 3014 (0.43{\%}) patients coded as having cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis had a lower median age (62 vs. 66 y; P<0.001) and were more likely to be male (52.3{\%} vs. 41.1{\%}; P<0.001). The inpatient mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis (2.4{\%} vs. 0.4{\%}; P<0.001) as was median LOS (4 vs. 3 d; P<0.001) and mean costs ($19,321 vs. $18,833; P<0.001). Patients with decompensated cirrhosis (vs. compensated cirrhosis) had significantly higher inpatient mortality rates (5.8{\%} vs. 1.1{\%}; P<0.001) with higher LOS and costs (P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, cirrhosis was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio, 4.22; 95{\%} confidence interval, 2.92-6.10). Hospital cirrhosis volume was inversely associated with mortality, while hospital orthopedic procedure volumes had an inconsistent impact on outcomes. Conclusions: Inpatient orthopedic procedures in patients with cirrhosis result in high postoperative mortality, LOS, and costs. Careful patient selection is warranted to optimize cirrhosis patient postoperative outcomes.",
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AB - Introduction: The population of patients with cirrhosis is growing and shifting toward a more elderly demographic and thus are at risk of developing orthopedic complications. There is lack of data on safety of orthopedic procedures in this population. Methods: We performed an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2005 to 2011 for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, and spinal laminectomy/fusion, stratified by presence of cirrhosis. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality and secondary endpoints included length of stay (LOS) and costs. Results: There were 693,610 inpatient stays for orthopedic procedures conducted during the study period, with 3014 (0.43%) patients coded as having cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis had a lower median age (62 vs. 66 y; P<0.001) and were more likely to be male (52.3% vs. 41.1%; P<0.001). The inpatient mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis (2.4% vs. 0.4%; P<0.001) as was median LOS (4 vs. 3 d; P<0.001) and mean costs ($19,321 vs. $18,833; P<0.001). Patients with decompensated cirrhosis (vs. compensated cirrhosis) had significantly higher inpatient mortality rates (5.8% vs. 1.1%; P<0.001) with higher LOS and costs (P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, cirrhosis was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio, 4.22; 95% confidence interval, 2.92-6.10). Hospital cirrhosis volume was inversely associated with mortality, while hospital orthopedic procedure volumes had an inconsistent impact on outcomes. Conclusions: Inpatient orthopedic procedures in patients with cirrhosis result in high postoperative mortality, LOS, and costs. Careful patient selection is warranted to optimize cirrhosis patient postoperative outcomes.

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