Outcomes are Local: Patient, Disease, and Procedure-Specific Risk Factors for Colorectal Surgical Site Infections from a Single Institution

Robert R. Cima, John R. Bergquist, Kristine T. Hanson, Cornelius A. Thiels, Elizabeth B Habermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Colorectal surgical site infections (SSIs) contribute to postoperative morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization. Risk factors associated with colorectal SSI are well-documented. However, quality improvement efforts are informed by national data, which may not identify institution-specific risk factors. Method: Retrospective cohort study of colorectal surgery patients uses institutional ACS-NSQIP data from 2006 through 2014. ACS-NSQIP data were enhanced with additional variables from medical records. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with SSI development. Results: Of 2376 patients, 213 (9.0%) developed at least one SSI (superficial 4.8%, deep 1.1%, organ space 3.5%). Age < 40, BMI > 30, ASA3+, steroid use, smoking, diabetes, pre-operative sepsis, higher wound class, elevated WBC or serum glutamic-oxalocetic transaminase, low hematocrit or albumin, Crohn’s disease, and prolonged incision-to-closure time were associated with increased SSI rate (all P < 0.01). After adjustment, BMI > 30, steroids, diabetes, and wound contamination were associated with SSI. Patients with Crohn’s had greater odds of SSI than other indications. Conclusion: Institutional modeling of SSI suggests that many previously suggested risk factors established on a national level do not contribute to SSIs at our institution. Identification of institution-specific predictors of SSI, rather than relying upon conclusions derived from external data, is a critical endeavor in facilitating quality improvement and maximizing value of quality investments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1142-1152
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Surgical Wound Infection
Quality Improvement
Steroids
Colorectal Surgery
Wounds and Injuries
Transaminases
Hematocrit
Crohn Disease
Medical Records
Albumins
Sepsis
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Colorectal surgery
  • Modeling
  • Quality improvement
  • Surgical outcomes
  • Surgical site infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Outcomes are Local : Patient, Disease, and Procedure-Specific Risk Factors for Colorectal Surgical Site Infections from a Single Institution. / Cima, Robert R.; Bergquist, John R.; Hanson, Kristine T.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1142-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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