Outcomes and Principles of Patient Selection for Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumor Management: A Multisite Institutional Case Series

Cecile Riviere-Cazaux, Archis R. Bhandarkar, Masum Rahman, Clark R. Zheng, Megan M.J. Bauman, Ryan M. Naylor, Jamie J. Van Gompel, Richard S. Zimmerman, Jaclyn J. White, Ian F. Parney, Kaisorn L. Chaichana, Kai J. Miller, Vance T. Lehman, Timothy J. Kaufmann, Terry C. Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is an emerging treatment modality for both primary brain tumors and metastases. We report initial outcomes after LITT for metastatic brain tumors across 3 sites at our institution and discuss potential strategies for optimal patient selection and outcomes. Methods: International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision and Tenth Revision codes were used to identify patients with malignant brain tumors treated via LITT across all 3 Mayo Clinic sites with at least 6 months follow-up. Local control was based on radiologic and clinical evidence. Overall survival was measured from time of receiving LITT until death or end of the study period. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated for progression of a single (n = 21) or multiple (n = 2) previously radiated metastatic lesions and/or radiation necrosis. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range, 47–66.5 years). LITT achieved local control of the lesion in most patients with metastatic tumors or radiation necrosis (n = 18; 81.8%) for the duration of follow-up. One patient did not have local control data available. Thirteen (56.5%) patients remained alive at the end of the study period. No other patients died of their treated disease during the study period; 5 of 10 deaths were attributable to central nervous system progression outside the treated lesion. Although median survival for this cohort has not yet been reached, the current median survival is 16 months (interquartile range, 12–48.5 months) after LITT for metastatic/radiation necrosis lesions. Conclusions: LITT was associated with sustained local control in 81.8% of patients treated for radiographic progression of metastatic central nervous system disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e520-e531
JournalWorld neurosurgery
Volume165
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2022

Keywords

  • Brain tumor
  • Laser ablation
  • Laser interstitial thermal therapy
  • Metastases
  • Oncology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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