Outcome of pulmonary and aortic homografts for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction

Ko Bando, Gordon K. Danielson, Hartzell V Schaff, Douglas D. Mair, Paul R. Julsrud, Francisco J. Puga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

163 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine late patient outcome and homograft durability, we reviewed 326 patients who received aortic ( n = 230) or pulmonary ( n = 118) cryopreserved homografts for right ventricular outflow reconstruction between January 1985 and October 1993. Patient survival, including operative mortality, 5 years after the operation was similar between the two groups (ulmonary homograft 86%, aortic homograft 80%; p = not significant by log-rank test). However, 5-year freedom from homograft failure was significantly better for pulmonary homografts (94% versus 70%), p < 0.01 by log-rank test). Late calcification was evaluated by chest roentgenography and echocardiography. Overall, 20% of aortic homografts became moderately or severely calcified compared with 4% of pulmonary homografts ( p < 0.001). Twenty-six percent of aortic homografts in children 4 years old or younger had moderate or severe obstruction associated with calcification, whereas only 11% of aortic homografts in patients over 4 years of age had calcific obstruction ( p < 0.01). No late deaths among patients receiving pulmonary homografts were related to graft failure; two late deaths in the aortic homograft group were homograft related. Risk factors for patient mortality and homograft failure (defined as either need for homograft replacement because of homograft failure ( p < 0.0001), but type of homograft was not correlated with patient mortality. Age 4 years or younger was a significant risk factor for homograft failure ( p < 0.0001), but type of homograft was not correlated with patient mortality. Age 4 years or younger was a significant risk factor for both mortality ( p < 0.01) and homograft failure ( p = 0.03) in aortic homograft recipients but not in pulmonary homograft recipients. These results indicate that both aortic and pulmonary homografts provided excellent intermediate-term patient survival after right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction, but pulmonary homografts are more durable than aortic homografts with less calcification and obstruction, especially among children 4 years old or younger. (J T HORAC C ARDIOVASC SURG 1995; 109: 509-18).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-518
Number of pages10
JournalThe Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume109
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

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