Outcome for children with metastatic solid tumors over the last four decades

Stephanie M. Perkins, Eric T. Shinohara, Todd DeWees, Haydar Frangoul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Outcomes for pediatric solid tumors have significantly improved over the last 30 years. However, much of this improvement is due to improved outcome for patients with localized disease. Here we evaluate overall survival (OS) for pediatric patients with metastatic disease over the last 40 years. Procedure: The United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was used to conduct this study. Patients diagnosed between 0 and 18 years of age with metastatic Ewings sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor were included in the analysis. Results: 3,009 patients diagnosed between 1973-2010 met inclusion criteria for analysis. OS at 10 years for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2010 was 28.3%, 37.2%, 44.7% and 49.3%, respectively (p,0.001). For patients diagnosed between 2000-2010, 10-year OS for patients with Ewing sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Wilms tumor was 30.6%, 54.4%, 29.3%, 27.5%, and 76.6%, respectively, as compared to 13.8%, 25.1%, 13.6%, 17.9% and 57.1%, respectively, for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979. OS for neuroblastoma significantly increased with each decade. For patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma, there was no improvement in OS over the last two decades. There was no improvement in outcome for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor over the last 30 years. Conclusions: OS for pediatric patients with metastatic solid tumors has significantly improved since the 1970s. However, outcome has changed little for some malignancies in the last 20-30 years. These data underscore the importance of continued collaboration and studies to improve outcome for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere100396
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Tumors
Pediatrics
neoplasms
Neoplasms
Ewing's Sarcoma
osteosarcoma
Survival
Wilms Tumor
Rhabdomyosarcoma
sarcoma
Osteosarcoma
Epidemiology
Neuroblastoma
epidemiology
Databases
monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Outcome for children with metastatic solid tumors over the last four decades. / Perkins, Stephanie M.; Shinohara, Eric T.; DeWees, Todd; Frangoul, Haydar.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e100396, 08.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perkins, Stephanie M. ; Shinohara, Eric T. ; DeWees, Todd ; Frangoul, Haydar. / Outcome for children with metastatic solid tumors over the last four decades. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 7.
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abstract = "Background: Outcomes for pediatric solid tumors have significantly improved over the last 30 years. However, much of this improvement is due to improved outcome for patients with localized disease. Here we evaluate overall survival (OS) for pediatric patients with metastatic disease over the last 40 years. Procedure: The United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was used to conduct this study. Patients diagnosed between 0 and 18 years of age with metastatic Ewings sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor were included in the analysis. Results: 3,009 patients diagnosed between 1973-2010 met inclusion criteria for analysis. OS at 10 years for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2010 was 28.3{\%}, 37.2{\%}, 44.7{\%} and 49.3{\%}, respectively (p,0.001). For patients diagnosed between 2000-2010, 10-year OS for patients with Ewing sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Wilms tumor was 30.6{\%}, 54.4{\%}, 29.3{\%}, 27.5{\%}, and 76.6{\%}, respectively, as compared to 13.8{\%}, 25.1{\%}, 13.6{\%}, 17.9{\%} and 57.1{\%}, respectively, for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979. OS for neuroblastoma significantly increased with each decade. For patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma, there was no improvement in OS over the last two decades. There was no improvement in outcome for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor over the last 30 years. Conclusions: OS for pediatric patients with metastatic solid tumors has significantly improved since the 1970s. However, outcome has changed little for some malignancies in the last 20-30 years. These data underscore the importance of continued collaboration and studies to improve outcome for these patients.",
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