Optimizing statin treatment decisions for diabetes patients in the presence of uncertain future adherence

Jennifer E. Mason, Darin A. England, Brian T. Denton, Steven A. Smith, Murat Kurt, Nilay D Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Statins are an important part of the treatment plan for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, patients who are prescribed statins often take less than the prescribed amount or stop taking the drug altogether. This suboptimal adherence may decrease the benefit of statin initiation. Objective. To estimate the influence of adherence on the optimal timing of statin initiation for patients with type 2 diabetes. Method. The authors use a Markov decision process (MDP) model to optimize the treatment decision for patients with type 2 diabetes. Their model incorporates a Markov model linking adherence to treatment effectiveness and long-term health outcomes. They determine the optimal time of statin initiation that minimizes expected costs and maximizes expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results. In the long run, approximately 25% of patients remain highly adherent to statins. Based on the MDP model, generic statins lower costs in men and result in a small increase in costs in women relative to no treatment. Patients are able to noticeably increase their expected QALYs by 0.5 to 2 years depending on the level of adherence. Conclusions. Adherence-improving interventions can increase expected QALYs by as much as 1.5 years. Given suboptimal adherence to statins, it is optimal to delay the start time for statins; however, changing the start time alone does not lead to significant changes in costs or QALYs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-166
Number of pages13
JournalMedical Decision Making
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Costs and Cost Analysis
Markov Chains
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • adherence
  • diabetes
  • Markov decision process
  • statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Optimizing statin treatment decisions for diabetes patients in the presence of uncertain future adherence. / Mason, Jennifer E.; England, Darin A.; Denton, Brian T.; Smith, Steven A.; Kurt, Murat; Shah, Nilay D.

In: Medical Decision Making, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 154-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mason, Jennifer E. ; England, Darin A. ; Denton, Brian T. ; Smith, Steven A. ; Kurt, Murat ; Shah, Nilay D. / Optimizing statin treatment decisions for diabetes patients in the presence of uncertain future adherence. In: Medical Decision Making. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 154-166.
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