Opioid-induced constipation negatively impacts pain management, productivity, and health-related quality of life: Findings from the National Health and Wellness Survey

Timothy Bell, Kathy Annunziata, John B. Leslie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize the impact of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) on healthcare resource use, work productivity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy. Design: Data were collected via Internet questionnaires during the international National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2004 from individuals aged ≥18 years who reported taking opioids for ≥6 months. Healthcare resource utilization, Work Productivity, and Activity Impairment, and Short-Form 8 (SF-8) questionnaire responses were compared between those who did or did not report OIC. Results: Data were available from 2,430 individuals receiving opioids, of whom 359 reported OIC. Participants with OIC reported significantly more physician visits (mean difference 3-84 visits; p < 0.05) and alternative care provider visits (mean difference 1.73 visits; p < 0.05) over the previous 6 months than those without OIC; however, no significant differences in emergency room visits or number of days of hospitalization were observed. Respondents with OIC also reported significantly greater time missed from work, impairment while working, overall work impairment, and activity impairment (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). HRQOL scores were significantly lower in the OIC group than those without OIC on both the physical and mental components of the SF-8 questionnaire (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The survey results refect a negative impact of OIC on individuals' HRQOL and on society in terms of healthcare resource use and work productivity beyond that imposed by patients' pain conditions. These findings indicate a need for effective treatment for opioid-induced constipation in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-144
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Opioid Management
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2009

Fingerprint

Constipation
Pain Management
Health Surveys
Opioid Analgesics
Quality of Life
Delivery of Health Care
Internet
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Constipation
  • Opioid
  • Pain management
  • Productivity
  • Quality-of-life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Opioid-induced constipation negatively impacts pain management, productivity, and health-related quality of life : Findings from the National Health and Wellness Survey. / Bell, Timothy; Annunziata, Kathy; Leslie, John B.

In: Journal of Opioid Management, Vol. 5, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 137-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7643e1d049564c9a94fcf794903f3da5,
title = "Opioid-induced constipation negatively impacts pain management, productivity, and health-related quality of life: Findings from the National Health and Wellness Survey",
abstract = "Objective: To characterize the impact of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) on healthcare resource use, work productivity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy. Design: Data were collected via Internet questionnaires during the international National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2004 from individuals aged ≥18 years who reported taking opioids for ≥6 months. Healthcare resource utilization, Work Productivity, and Activity Impairment, and Short-Form 8 (SF-8) questionnaire responses were compared between those who did or did not report OIC. Results: Data were available from 2,430 individuals receiving opioids, of whom 359 reported OIC. Participants with OIC reported significantly more physician visits (mean difference 3-84 visits; p < 0.05) and alternative care provider visits (mean difference 1.73 visits; p < 0.05) over the previous 6 months than those without OIC; however, no significant differences in emergency room visits or number of days of hospitalization were observed. Respondents with OIC also reported significantly greater time missed from work, impairment while working, overall work impairment, and activity impairment (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). HRQOL scores were significantly lower in the OIC group than those without OIC on both the physical and mental components of the SF-8 questionnaire (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The survey results refect a negative impact of OIC on individuals' HRQOL and on society in terms of healthcare resource use and work productivity beyond that imposed by patients' pain conditions. These findings indicate a need for effective treatment for opioid-induced constipation in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy.",
keywords = "Constipation, Opioid, Pain management, Productivity, Quality-of-life",
author = "Timothy Bell and Kathy Annunziata and Leslie, {John B.}",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "137--144",
journal = "Journal of Opioid Management",
issn = "1551-7489",
publisher = "Weston Medical Publishing",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Opioid-induced constipation negatively impacts pain management, productivity, and health-related quality of life

T2 - Findings from the National Health and Wellness Survey

AU - Bell, Timothy

AU - Annunziata, Kathy

AU - Leslie, John B.

PY - 2009/5

Y1 - 2009/5

N2 - Objective: To characterize the impact of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) on healthcare resource use, work productivity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy. Design: Data were collected via Internet questionnaires during the international National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2004 from individuals aged ≥18 years who reported taking opioids for ≥6 months. Healthcare resource utilization, Work Productivity, and Activity Impairment, and Short-Form 8 (SF-8) questionnaire responses were compared between those who did or did not report OIC. Results: Data were available from 2,430 individuals receiving opioids, of whom 359 reported OIC. Participants with OIC reported significantly more physician visits (mean difference 3-84 visits; p < 0.05) and alternative care provider visits (mean difference 1.73 visits; p < 0.05) over the previous 6 months than those without OIC; however, no significant differences in emergency room visits or number of days of hospitalization were observed. Respondents with OIC also reported significantly greater time missed from work, impairment while working, overall work impairment, and activity impairment (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). HRQOL scores were significantly lower in the OIC group than those without OIC on both the physical and mental components of the SF-8 questionnaire (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The survey results refect a negative impact of OIC on individuals' HRQOL and on society in terms of healthcare resource use and work productivity beyond that imposed by patients' pain conditions. These findings indicate a need for effective treatment for opioid-induced constipation in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy.

AB - Objective: To characterize the impact of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) on healthcare resource use, work productivity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy. Design: Data were collected via Internet questionnaires during the international National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) 2004 from individuals aged ≥18 years who reported taking opioids for ≥6 months. Healthcare resource utilization, Work Productivity, and Activity Impairment, and Short-Form 8 (SF-8) questionnaire responses were compared between those who did or did not report OIC. Results: Data were available from 2,430 individuals receiving opioids, of whom 359 reported OIC. Participants with OIC reported significantly more physician visits (mean difference 3-84 visits; p < 0.05) and alternative care provider visits (mean difference 1.73 visits; p < 0.05) over the previous 6 months than those without OIC; however, no significant differences in emergency room visits or number of days of hospitalization were observed. Respondents with OIC also reported significantly greater time missed from work, impairment while working, overall work impairment, and activity impairment (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). HRQOL scores were significantly lower in the OIC group than those without OIC on both the physical and mental components of the SF-8 questionnaire (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The survey results refect a negative impact of OIC on individuals' HRQOL and on society in terms of healthcare resource use and work productivity beyond that imposed by patients' pain conditions. These findings indicate a need for effective treatment for opioid-induced constipation in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy.

KW - Constipation

KW - Opioid

KW - Pain management

KW - Productivity

KW - Quality-of-life

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68349085606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68349085606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19662923

AN - SCOPUS:68349085606

VL - 5

SP - 137

EP - 144

JO - Journal of Opioid Management

JF - Journal of Opioid Management

SN - 1551-7489

IS - 3

ER -