Oophorectomy, menopause, estrogen treatment, and cognitive aging: Clinical evidence for a window of opportunity

Walter A Rocca, Brandon R. Grossardt, Lynne T. Shuster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The neuroprotective effects of estrogen have been demonstrated consistently in cellular and animal studies but the evidence in women remains conflicted. We explored the window of opportunity hypothesis in relation to cognitive aging and dementia. In particular, we reviewed existing literature, reanalyzed some of our data, and combined results graphically. Current evidence suggests that estrogen may have beneficial, neutral, or detrimental effects on the brain depending on age at the time of treatment, type of menopause (natural versus medically or surgically induced), or stage of menopause. The comparison of women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy with referent women provided evidence for a sizeable neuroprotective effect of estrogen before age 50 years. Several case-control studies and cohort studies also showed neuroprotective effects in women who received estrogen treatment (ET) in the early postmenopausal stage (most commonly at ages 50-60 years). The majority of women in those observational studies had undergone natural menopause and were treated for the relief of menopausal symptoms. However, recent clinical trials by the Women's Health Initiative showed that women who initiated ET alone or in combination with a progestin in the late postmenopausal stage (ages 65-79 years) experienced an increased risk of dementia and cognitive decline regardless of the type of menopause. The current conflicting data can be explained by the window of opportunity hypothesis suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen depend on age at the time of administration, type of menopause, and stage of menopause. Therefore, women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause or women who experienced premature or early natural menopause should be considered for hormonal treatment until approximately age 51 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-198
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume1379
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 2011

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Ovariectomy
Menopause
Estrogens
Neuroprotective Agents
Therapeutics
Dementia
Cognitive Aging
Women's Health
Progestins
Observational Studies
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Clinical Trials
Brain

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Estrogen
  • Menopause
  • Oophorectomy
  • Window of opportunity hypothesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Oophorectomy, menopause, estrogen treatment, and cognitive aging : Clinical evidence for a window of opportunity. / Rocca, Walter A; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Shuster, Lynne T.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1379, 16.03.2011, p. 188-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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