Older age independently predicts a lower risk of sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

Jason Caywood, Richard J. Gray, Joseph Hentz, Barbara A Pockaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The influence of patient age on the risk of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis in breast cancer has not been defined. Methods: A breast cancer SLN database was analyzed. Factors associated with SLN metastasis were assessed by multiple logistic regression modeling. Age, T stage, estrogen receptor status, HER-2/neu status, grade, angiolymphatic invasion, lobular histology, tubular/mucinous histology, and the number of SLNs resected were assessed. Results: Data were available for 810 patients with invasive breast cancer. SLN metastasis was observed in 22% of the patients. The factors most strongly associated with SLN metastasis were angiolymphatic invasion, T stage, and age. Age ranged from 29 to 95 years. The median age was 66 years. Overall, SLN metastasis was more common in younger patients (≤66 years) than in older patients (>66 years; P < .001). Among patients without angiolymphatic invasion, SLN metastasis was nearly twice as common in the younger patients as in the older patients. The effect of angiolymphatic invasion as a risk for SLN metastasis was much greater in the older age group. Conclusions: In addition to known risk factors, age independently predicts the risk of SLN metastasis in breast cancer. Angiolymphatic invasion seems to be a more powerful predictor of SLN metastasis in older patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1061-1065
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

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Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Histology
Sentinel Lymph Node
Estrogen Receptors
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Databases

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Elderly
  • Neoplasm metastasis
  • Sentinel node

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Older age independently predicts a lower risk of sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. / Caywood, Jason; Gray, Richard J.; Hentz, Joseph; Pockaj, Barbara A.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 12, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1061-1065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caywood, Jason ; Gray, Richard J. ; Hentz, Joseph ; Pockaj, Barbara A. / Older age independently predicts a lower risk of sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2005 ; Vol. 12, No. 12. pp. 1061-1065.
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AU - Gray, Richard J.

AU - Hentz, Joseph

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N2 - Background: The influence of patient age on the risk of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis in breast cancer has not been defined. Methods: A breast cancer SLN database was analyzed. Factors associated with SLN metastasis were assessed by multiple logistic regression modeling. Age, T stage, estrogen receptor status, HER-2/neu status, grade, angiolymphatic invasion, lobular histology, tubular/mucinous histology, and the number of SLNs resected were assessed. Results: Data were available for 810 patients with invasive breast cancer. SLN metastasis was observed in 22% of the patients. The factors most strongly associated with SLN metastasis were angiolymphatic invasion, T stage, and age. Age ranged from 29 to 95 years. The median age was 66 years. Overall, SLN metastasis was more common in younger patients (≤66 years) than in older patients (>66 years; P < .001). Among patients without angiolymphatic invasion, SLN metastasis was nearly twice as common in the younger patients as in the older patients. The effect of angiolymphatic invasion as a risk for SLN metastasis was much greater in the older age group. Conclusions: In addition to known risk factors, age independently predicts the risk of SLN metastasis in breast cancer. Angiolymphatic invasion seems to be a more powerful predictor of SLN metastasis in older patients.

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KW - Neoplasm metastasis

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