Occupational differences between alzheimer's and aphasic dementias: Implication for teachers

Keith A. Josephs, Sarah M. Papenfuss, Joseph R. Duffy, Edythe A. Strand, Mary M. MacHulda, Jennifer L. Whitwell, Ronald C. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We aimed to determine whether there is an association between teaching and the development of progressive speech and language disorders (SLDs). Occupation was compared between 100 patients with a progressive SLD, 404 patients with Alzheimer's dementia, and the 2008 US census. In SLDs, the most common occupation was teacher (22%) versus 8% in Alzheimer's dementia. The odds ratio (OR) of being a teacher in SLDs compared to Alzheimer's dementia was 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.87-6.17). No differences were observed in the frequency of other occupations. The frequency of teachers was higher in SLDs compared to the US census, OR of 6.9 (95% CI = 4.3-11.1). Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations were more frequent in SLDs compared to the US census. We identified an association between progressive SLDs and the occupation of teaching. Since teaching is a communication demanding occupation, teachers may be more sensitive to the development of speech and language impairments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-616
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's
  • aphasia
  • dementia
  • occupation
  • teacher

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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