Occult hepatitis B

Michael Torbenson, David L. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

417 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Worldwide, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the primary cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and is one of the ten leading causes of death. Traditionally, people with chronic HBV infection have been identified with blood tests for HBV antigens and antibodies. Recently, another group of patients with chronic HBV infection has been identified by sensitive, molecular testing for HBV DNA. Members of this group are often referred to as having occult hepatitis B because they are HBV-DNA positive, but hepatitis B surface antigen negative. Occult hepatitis B occurs in a number of clinical settings. In this review, we examine occult hepatitis B in people co-infected with hepatitis C, in whom occult hepatitis B has been associated with advanced fibrosis and diminished response to interferon α. Although much more research is needed, existing reports justify a heightened awareness of the medical importance and means of testing for occult hepatitis B.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalLancet Infectious Diseases
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B virus
Chronic Hepatitis B
Virus Diseases
Fibrosis
Hepatitis B Antigens
Hepatitis B Antibodies
DNA
Hematologic Tests
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Interferons
Cause of Death
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Occult hepatitis B. / Torbenson, Michael; Thomas, David L.

In: Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol. 2, No. 8, 01.01.2002, p. 479-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Torbenson, Michael ; Thomas, David L. / Occult hepatitis B. In: Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2002 ; Vol. 2, No. 8. pp. 479-486.
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