Observations on the senescence of cells derived from articular cartilage

Christopher H Evans, Helga I. Georgescu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the experiments described here, we have sought to determine whether primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage will, upon subsequent subculture, undergo in vitro senescence in a manner analogous to that described for several other types of diploid cell. Using cells from the articular cartilage of rabbits, dogs and man, we have established that the population doubling capacity of cultures of these cells is directly related to the specific lifespan of the donor organism. Furthermore, the doubling capacity of the initial cultures of lapine articular chondrocytes is inversely related to the age of the donor rabbit. By these criteria, serially passaged primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage appear, a priori, to be a valid system for studies of cellular ageing. Monolayer cultures of lapine chondrocytes appear to "dedifferentiate" after several passages. However, the same cells can be grown as clones, under which conditions they appear to retain better their differentiated properties. Even under these circumstances, lapine articular chondrocytes have a limited capacity for growth, which can be calculated to approximate to the same average number of cell divisions as undergone by monolayer cultures. Lapine chondrocytes frequently transform into established lines of fibroblastic cells. Transformation of canine chondrocytes was more rare, while human chondrocytes have not been observed to transform. This suggests that resistance to transformation is somehow related to lifespan. In addition to furthering our understanding of cellular ageing, studies of the senescence of articular chondrocytes could provide new insights into the aetiology of primary osteoarthritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-191
Number of pages13
JournalMechanisms of Ageing and Development
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cell Aging
Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Chondrocytes
Monolayers
Aging of materials
Primary Cell Culture
Joints
Cell culture
Cells
Tissue Donors
Rabbits
Diploidy
Osteoarthritis
Cell Division
Experiments
Canidae
Clone Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Dogs

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Cell division
  • Cellular senescence
  • Chondrocyte
  • Osteoarthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Biochemistry
  • Developmental Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Observations on the senescence of cells derived from articular cartilage. / Evans, Christopher H; Georgescu, Helga I.

In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1983, p. 179-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4cfeaa2d339242b19bce08c4fe58b092,
title = "Observations on the senescence of cells derived from articular cartilage",
abstract = "In the experiments described here, we have sought to determine whether primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage will, upon subsequent subculture, undergo in vitro senescence in a manner analogous to that described for several other types of diploid cell. Using cells from the articular cartilage of rabbits, dogs and man, we have established that the population doubling capacity of cultures of these cells is directly related to the specific lifespan of the donor organism. Furthermore, the doubling capacity of the initial cultures of lapine articular chondrocytes is inversely related to the age of the donor rabbit. By these criteria, serially passaged primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage appear, a priori, to be a valid system for studies of cellular ageing. Monolayer cultures of lapine chondrocytes appear to {"}dedifferentiate{"} after several passages. However, the same cells can be grown as clones, under which conditions they appear to retain better their differentiated properties. Even under these circumstances, lapine articular chondrocytes have a limited capacity for growth, which can be calculated to approximate to the same average number of cell divisions as undergone by monolayer cultures. Lapine chondrocytes frequently transform into established lines of fibroblastic cells. Transformation of canine chondrocytes was more rare, while human chondrocytes have not been observed to transform. This suggests that resistance to transformation is somehow related to lifespan. In addition to furthering our understanding of cellular ageing, studies of the senescence of articular chondrocytes could provide new insights into the aetiology of primary osteoarthritis.",
keywords = "Cartilage, Cell division, Cellular senescence, Chondrocyte, Osteoarthritis",
author = "Evans, {Christopher H} and Georgescu, {Helga I.}",
year = "1983",
doi = "10.1016/0047-6374(83)90111-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "179--191",
journal = "Mechanisms of Ageing and Development",
issn = "0047-6374",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Observations on the senescence of cells derived from articular cartilage

AU - Evans, Christopher H

AU - Georgescu, Helga I.

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - In the experiments described here, we have sought to determine whether primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage will, upon subsequent subculture, undergo in vitro senescence in a manner analogous to that described for several other types of diploid cell. Using cells from the articular cartilage of rabbits, dogs and man, we have established that the population doubling capacity of cultures of these cells is directly related to the specific lifespan of the donor organism. Furthermore, the doubling capacity of the initial cultures of lapine articular chondrocytes is inversely related to the age of the donor rabbit. By these criteria, serially passaged primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage appear, a priori, to be a valid system for studies of cellular ageing. Monolayer cultures of lapine chondrocytes appear to "dedifferentiate" after several passages. However, the same cells can be grown as clones, under which conditions they appear to retain better their differentiated properties. Even under these circumstances, lapine articular chondrocytes have a limited capacity for growth, which can be calculated to approximate to the same average number of cell divisions as undergone by monolayer cultures. Lapine chondrocytes frequently transform into established lines of fibroblastic cells. Transformation of canine chondrocytes was more rare, while human chondrocytes have not been observed to transform. This suggests that resistance to transformation is somehow related to lifespan. In addition to furthering our understanding of cellular ageing, studies of the senescence of articular chondrocytes could provide new insights into the aetiology of primary osteoarthritis.

AB - In the experiments described here, we have sought to determine whether primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage will, upon subsequent subculture, undergo in vitro senescence in a manner analogous to that described for several other types of diploid cell. Using cells from the articular cartilage of rabbits, dogs and man, we have established that the population doubling capacity of cultures of these cells is directly related to the specific lifespan of the donor organism. Furthermore, the doubling capacity of the initial cultures of lapine articular chondrocytes is inversely related to the age of the donor rabbit. By these criteria, serially passaged primary cultures of cells derived from articular cartilage appear, a priori, to be a valid system for studies of cellular ageing. Monolayer cultures of lapine chondrocytes appear to "dedifferentiate" after several passages. However, the same cells can be grown as clones, under which conditions they appear to retain better their differentiated properties. Even under these circumstances, lapine articular chondrocytes have a limited capacity for growth, which can be calculated to approximate to the same average number of cell divisions as undergone by monolayer cultures. Lapine chondrocytes frequently transform into established lines of fibroblastic cells. Transformation of canine chondrocytes was more rare, while human chondrocytes have not been observed to transform. This suggests that resistance to transformation is somehow related to lifespan. In addition to furthering our understanding of cellular ageing, studies of the senescence of articular chondrocytes could provide new insights into the aetiology of primary osteoarthritis.

KW - Cartilage

KW - Cell division

KW - Cellular senescence

KW - Chondrocyte

KW - Osteoarthritis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020643320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020643320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0047-6374(83)90111-2

DO - 10.1016/0047-6374(83)90111-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 6632992

AN - SCOPUS:0020643320

VL - 22

SP - 179

EP - 191

JO - Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

JF - Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

SN - 0047-6374

IS - 2

ER -