Nutritional Deficiencies in Celiac Disease

Susan H. Barton, Darlene G. Kelly, Joseph A Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Celiac disease is characterized by small bowel enteropathy, precipitated in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of "gluten," which is a term used to encompass the storage proteins of wheat, rye, and barley. Although the intestine heals with removal of gluten from the diet, the intolerance is permanent and the damage recurs if gluten is reintroduced. This damage causes a wide variety of consequence including maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in the characteristic, although not universal, features of malnutrition. This article examines recent advances in the understanding of the spectrum of celiac disease, illustrates the impact of celiac disease on nutrition, and describes approaches to the management of the disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-108
Number of pages16
JournalGastroenterology Clinics of North America
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Fingerprint

Glutens
Celiac Disease
Malnutrition
Hordeum
Disease Management
Triticum
Intestines
Eating
Diet
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Nutritional Deficiencies in Celiac Disease. / Barton, Susan H.; Kelly, Darlene G.; Murray, Joseph A.

In: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Vol. 36, No. 1, 03.2007, p. 93-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Barton, Susan H. ; Kelly, Darlene G. ; Murray, Joseph A. / Nutritional Deficiencies in Celiac Disease. In: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 93-108.
@article{dc290051ffc94babbd928b71730a7229,
title = "Nutritional Deficiencies in Celiac Disease",
abstract = "Celiac disease is characterized by small bowel enteropathy, precipitated in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of {"}gluten,{"} which is a term used to encompass the storage proteins of wheat, rye, and barley. Although the intestine heals with removal of gluten from the diet, the intolerance is permanent and the damage recurs if gluten is reintroduced. This damage causes a wide variety of consequence including maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in the characteristic, although not universal, features of malnutrition. This article examines recent advances in the understanding of the spectrum of celiac disease, illustrates the impact of celiac disease on nutrition, and describes approaches to the management of the disease.",
author = "Barton, {Susan H.} and Kelly, {Darlene G.} and Murray, {Joseph A}",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.gtc.2007.01.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "93--108",
journal = "Gastroenterology Clinics of North America",
issn = "0889-8553",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nutritional Deficiencies in Celiac Disease

AU - Barton, Susan H.

AU - Kelly, Darlene G.

AU - Murray, Joseph A

PY - 2007/3

Y1 - 2007/3

N2 - Celiac disease is characterized by small bowel enteropathy, precipitated in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of "gluten," which is a term used to encompass the storage proteins of wheat, rye, and barley. Although the intestine heals with removal of gluten from the diet, the intolerance is permanent and the damage recurs if gluten is reintroduced. This damage causes a wide variety of consequence including maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in the characteristic, although not universal, features of malnutrition. This article examines recent advances in the understanding of the spectrum of celiac disease, illustrates the impact of celiac disease on nutrition, and describes approaches to the management of the disease.

AB - Celiac disease is characterized by small bowel enteropathy, precipitated in genetically susceptible individuals by the ingestion of "gluten," which is a term used to encompass the storage proteins of wheat, rye, and barley. Although the intestine heals with removal of gluten from the diet, the intolerance is permanent and the damage recurs if gluten is reintroduced. This damage causes a wide variety of consequence including maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in the characteristic, although not universal, features of malnutrition. This article examines recent advances in the understanding of the spectrum of celiac disease, illustrates the impact of celiac disease on nutrition, and describes approaches to the management of the disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247540825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247540825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.gtc.2007.01.006

DO - 10.1016/j.gtc.2007.01.006

M3 - Review article

VL - 36

SP - 93

EP - 108

JO - Gastroenterology Clinics of North America

JF - Gastroenterology Clinics of North America

SN - 0889-8553

IS - 1

ER -