Nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions: Testing the risk perception attitude framework

Helen W. Sullivan, Ellen Burke Beckjord, Lila J Rutten, Bradford W. Hesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested whether the risk perception attitude framework predicted nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions. Data from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed to assess respondents' reported likelihood of developing cancer (risk) and perceptions of whether they could lower their chances of getting cancer (efficacy). Respondents with higher efficacy were more likely to report that good nutrition can prevent cancer, and they reported more preventive dietary changes, as compared to respondents with lower efficacy. Respondents with higher efficacy were more likely to report intentions to change their diets to prevent cancer, and they reported more preventive dietary changes to their own diets but only at higher levels of risk. Results suggest that to improve cognitions about the role of nutrition in cancer prevention, interventions should target cancer prevention efficacy; however, to increase intentions to change nutrition behaviors, interventions should target efficacy and risk perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)866-879
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognition
Neoplasms
Diet
Nutrition
Cancer
Testing
Risk Perception
Behavioral Intention
Efficacy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

Keywords

  • Cancer prevention
  • Health Information National Trends Survey
  • Risk perception attitude framework

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions : Testing the risk perception attitude framework. / Sullivan, Helen W.; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Rutten, Lila J; Hesse, Bradford W.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 35, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 866-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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