Number of involved extracranial organs predicts survival in patients with brain metastasis from small cell lung cancer

Lavinia Gerdan, Barbara Šegedin, Theo Veninga, Steven E. Schild, Dirk Rades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aim: To investigate the prognostic role of the number of involved extracranial organs in patients with brain metastasis from small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods: Data of 155 patients receiving wholebrain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone for brain metastasis from SCLC were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to the number of involved extracranial organs, six potential prognostic factors were analyzed including WBRT regimen, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and interval from diagnosis of SCLC to WBRT. Results: Six-month survival rates of patients with involvement of 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 extracranial organs were 52%, 29%, 9%, and 0%, respectively (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of involved extracranial organs remained significant (p=0.003). Older age (p=0.005), lower KPS (p<0.001), and greater number of brain metastases (p=0.005) were also significantly associated with poorer survival. Conclusion: The number of involved extracranial organs is an independent prognostic factor of survival in SCLC patients with brain metastasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3887-3890
Number of pages4
JournalAnticancer research
Volume33
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • Extracranial organs
  • Prognostic factors
  • SCLC
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Number of involved extracranial organs predicts survival in patients with brain metastasis from small cell lung cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Gerdan, L., Šegedin, B., Veninga, T., Schild, S. E., & Rades, D. (2013). Number of involved extracranial organs predicts survival in patients with brain metastasis from small cell lung cancer. Anticancer research, 33(9), 3887-3890.