Novel agents on the horizon for cancer therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

266 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although cancer remains a devastating diagnosis, several decades of preclinical progress in cancer biology and biotechnology have recently led to successful development of several biological agents that substantially improve survival and quality of life for some patients. There is now a rich pipeline of novel anticancer agents in early phase clinical trials. The specific tumor and stromal aberrancies targeted can be conceptualized as membrane-bound receptor kinases (HGF/c-Met, human epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor receptor pathways), intracellular signaling kinases (Src, PI3k/Akt/mTOR, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways), epigenetic abnormalities (DNA methyltransferase and histyone deacetylase), protein dynamics (heat shock protein 90, ubiquitin-proteasome system), and tumor vasculature and microenvironment (angiogenesis, HIF, endothelium, integrins). Several technologies are available to target these abnormalities. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors have been the more successful, and often complementary, approaches so far in clinical settings. The success of this target-based cancer drug development approach is discussed with examples of recently approved agents, such as bevacizumab, erlotinib, trastuzumab, sorafenib, and bortezomib. This review also highlights the pipeline of rationally designed drugs in clinical development that have the potential to impact clinical care in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-137
Number of pages27
JournalCA Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met
HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins
Tumor Microenvironment
Growth Factor Receptors
src-Family Kinases
Methyltransferases
Biological Factors
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Therapeutics
Biotechnology
Ubiquitin
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Epigenomics
Integrins
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Antineoplastic Agents
Endothelium
Phosphotransferases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Novel agents on the horizon for cancer therapy. / Ma, Wen Wee; Adjei, Alex.

In: CA Cancer Journal for Clinicians, Vol. 59, No. 2, 01.03.2009, p. 111-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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