Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease

Margaret M. Johnson, Ernest Andrew Waller, Jack P. Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria is occurring with greater frequency, and previously unrecognized manifestations of nontuberculous mycobacteria are being identified. Paralleling this increase, improvements in laboratory techniques now allow for more precise identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria and recognition of new species. Consequently, clinicians are more often confronted with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges relevant to the care of patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. RECENT FINDINGS: In response to this burgeoning clinical need, the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Disease Society of America jointly published an updated consensus statement on nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in 2007. This document, in conjunction with original investigations in the field, has advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease, its clinical manifestations, and the efficacy of medical and surgical therapy. SUMMARY: The present article will review our current understanding of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease with particular emphasis on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic decision making. Areas of clinical controversy in which current data are inadequate to guide our decision making will be highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-210
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent opinion in pulmonary medicine
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Keywords

  • Bronchiectasis
  • Hot tub lung
  • Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex
  • Mycobacterium kansasii
  • Nontuberculous mycobacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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