Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly

Nicholas J. Talley, Jonathan M. Evans, Kevin C. Fleming, William S. Harmsen, Alan R. Zinsmeister, L. Joseph Melton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in the elderly and, despite a paucity of data, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to be important risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the association of NSAIDs with dyspepsia and heartburn in a population-based study. An age- and gender-stratified random sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota, Caucasian residents aged 65 years and older was mailed a valid self-report questionnaire; 74% responded (N=1375). Age- and gender-adjusted (to 1980 US Caucasian population) prevalence rates for NSAID use, dyspepsia (defined as pain located in the upper abdomen or nausea), and heartburn (defined as retrosternal burning pain) were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of dyspepsia and heartburn with potential risk factors adjusting for age and gender. The age- and gender-adjusted annual prevalences (per 100) of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use were 60.0 (95% CI 57.2,62.7) and 26.1 (95% CI 23.6,28.7), respectively. The annual prevalences of dyspepsia and heartburn were 15.0 (95% CI 12.9,17.0) and 12.9 (95% CI 10.9,14.8), respectively. Aspirin was associated with dyspepsia and/or heartburn (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.2,2.2) as were nonaspirin NSAIDs (OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.3,2.6), but smoking and alcohol were not significant risk factors. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with almost a twofold risk of upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms in elderly community subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1345-1350
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1995

Fingerprint

Dyspepsia
Heartburn
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Aspirin
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Pain
Abdomen
Self Report
Nausea
Population
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Alcohols

Keywords

  • aspirin
  • dyspepsia
  • epidemiology
  • gastroesophageal reflux
  • nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs
  • prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Talley, N. J., Evans, J. M., Fleming, K. C., Harmsen, W. S., Zinsmeister, A. R., & Joseph Melton, L. (1995). Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 40(6), 1345-1350. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02065549

Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly. / Talley, Nicholas J.; Evans, Jonathan M.; Fleming, Kevin C.; Harmsen, William S.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Joseph Melton, L.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 6, 06.1995, p. 1345-1350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talley, NJ, Evans, JM, Fleming, KC, Harmsen, WS, Zinsmeister, AR & Joseph Melton, L 1995, 'Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly', Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 1345-1350. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02065549
Talley NJ, Evans JM, Fleming KC, Harmsen WS, Zinsmeister AR, Joseph Melton L. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly. Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 1995 Jun;40(6):1345-1350. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02065549
Talley, Nicholas J. ; Evans, Jonathan M. ; Fleming, Kevin C. ; Harmsen, William S. ; Zinsmeister, Alan R. ; Joseph Melton, L. / Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 1995 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 1345-1350.
@article{256530cfdcc6431da3e4c8c969866f59,
title = "Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly",
abstract = "Upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in the elderly and, despite a paucity of data, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to be important risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the association of NSAIDs with dyspepsia and heartburn in a population-based study. An age- and gender-stratified random sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota, Caucasian residents aged 65 years and older was mailed a valid self-report questionnaire; 74{\%} responded (N=1375). Age- and gender-adjusted (to 1980 US Caucasian population) prevalence rates for NSAID use, dyspepsia (defined as pain located in the upper abdomen or nausea), and heartburn (defined as retrosternal burning pain) were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of dyspepsia and heartburn with potential risk factors adjusting for age and gender. The age- and gender-adjusted annual prevalences (per 100) of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use were 60.0 (95{\%} CI 57.2,62.7) and 26.1 (95{\%} CI 23.6,28.7), respectively. The annual prevalences of dyspepsia and heartburn were 15.0 (95{\%} CI 12.9,17.0) and 12.9 (95{\%} CI 10.9,14.8), respectively. Aspirin was associated with dyspepsia and/or heartburn (OR=1.6, 95{\%} CI 1.2,2.2) as were nonaspirin NSAIDs (OR=1.8, 95{\%} CI 1.3,2.6), but smoking and alcohol were not significant risk factors. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with almost a twofold risk of upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms in elderly community subjects.",
keywords = "aspirin, dyspepsia, epidemiology, gastroesophageal reflux, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, prevalence",
author = "Talley, {Nicholas J.} and Evans, {Jonathan M.} and Fleming, {Kevin C.} and Harmsen, {William S.} and Zinsmeister, {Alan R.} and {Joseph Melton}, L.",
year = "1995",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/BF02065549",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1345--1350",
journal = "Digestive Diseases and Sciences",
issn = "0163-2116",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in the elderly

AU - Talley, Nicholas J.

AU - Evans, Jonathan M.

AU - Fleming, Kevin C.

AU - Harmsen, William S.

AU - Zinsmeister, Alan R.

AU - Joseph Melton, L.

PY - 1995/6

Y1 - 1995/6

N2 - Upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in the elderly and, despite a paucity of data, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to be important risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the association of NSAIDs with dyspepsia and heartburn in a population-based study. An age- and gender-stratified random sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota, Caucasian residents aged 65 years and older was mailed a valid self-report questionnaire; 74% responded (N=1375). Age- and gender-adjusted (to 1980 US Caucasian population) prevalence rates for NSAID use, dyspepsia (defined as pain located in the upper abdomen or nausea), and heartburn (defined as retrosternal burning pain) were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of dyspepsia and heartburn with potential risk factors adjusting for age and gender. The age- and gender-adjusted annual prevalences (per 100) of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use were 60.0 (95% CI 57.2,62.7) and 26.1 (95% CI 23.6,28.7), respectively. The annual prevalences of dyspepsia and heartburn were 15.0 (95% CI 12.9,17.0) and 12.9 (95% CI 10.9,14.8), respectively. Aspirin was associated with dyspepsia and/or heartburn (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.2,2.2) as were nonaspirin NSAIDs (OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.3,2.6), but smoking and alcohol were not significant risk factors. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with almost a twofold risk of upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms in elderly community subjects.

AB - Upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in the elderly and, despite a paucity of data, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to be important risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the association of NSAIDs with dyspepsia and heartburn in a population-based study. An age- and gender-stratified random sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota, Caucasian residents aged 65 years and older was mailed a valid self-report questionnaire; 74% responded (N=1375). Age- and gender-adjusted (to 1980 US Caucasian population) prevalence rates for NSAID use, dyspepsia (defined as pain located in the upper abdomen or nausea), and heartburn (defined as retrosternal burning pain) were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of dyspepsia and heartburn with potential risk factors adjusting for age and gender. The age- and gender-adjusted annual prevalences (per 100) of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID use were 60.0 (95% CI 57.2,62.7) and 26.1 (95% CI 23.6,28.7), respectively. The annual prevalences of dyspepsia and heartburn were 15.0 (95% CI 12.9,17.0) and 12.9 (95% CI 10.9,14.8), respectively. Aspirin was associated with dyspepsia and/or heartburn (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.2,2.2) as were nonaspirin NSAIDs (OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.3,2.6), but smoking and alcohol were not significant risk factors. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with almost a twofold risk of upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms in elderly community subjects.

KW - aspirin

KW - dyspepsia

KW - epidemiology

KW - gastroesophageal reflux

KW - nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

KW - prevalence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029120106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029120106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF02065549

DO - 10.1007/BF02065549

M3 - Article

C2 - 7781458

AN - SCOPUS:0029120106

VL - 40

SP - 1345

EP - 1350

JO - Digestive Diseases and Sciences

JF - Digestive Diseases and Sciences

SN - 0163-2116

IS - 6

ER -