Nonresolving pneumonia in an otherwise healthy patient

Michael Gotway, J. W T Leung, Samuel K. Dawn, Arthur Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chest radiographs in patients with community-acquired pneumonia usually show resolution of opacities within a matter of a few weeks following the initiation of treatment. For elderly patients, patients requiring hospitalization for treatment of pneumonia, and patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia, radiographic resolution of pneumonia may be prolonged. Chest radiographic findings suggesting pneumonia that persists beyond 3 months following presentation should raise concern for infection with resistant organisms, unusual pulmonary pathogens, neoplasms, or a host of noninfectious inflammatory lesions. For such patients, further evaluation with thoracic computed tomography scanning, as well as invasive diagnostic procedures, are often required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-200
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Pulmonary Medicine
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pneumonia
Thorax
Lung Neoplasms
Hospitalization
Tomography
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • Amebiasis
  • Pneumonia
  • Radiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Nonresolving pneumonia in an otherwise healthy patient. / Gotway, Michael; Leung, J. W T; Dawn, Samuel K.; Hill, Arthur.

In: Clinical Pulmonary Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 3, 05.2004, p. 198-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gotway, Michael ; Leung, J. W T ; Dawn, Samuel K. ; Hill, Arthur. / Nonresolving pneumonia in an otherwise healthy patient. In: Clinical Pulmonary Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 198-200.
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