Nonpharmacologic approach to fatigue in patients with cancer

Deirdre R. Pachman, Katharine A. Price, Elise Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer-related fatigue is a common yet underappreciated problem with a significant impact on functional ability and quality of life. Practice guidelines mandate that all cancer patients and survivors be screened for cancer-related fatigue (CRF) at regular intervals. Comorbidi-ties that could contribute to fatigue should be treated, and patients with moderate to severe fatigue should undergo a comprehensive evaluation. Nonpharmacologic interventions are important tools to combat CRF and should be incorporated into routine practice. Physical activity, educational interventions, and cognitive-behavioral therapy have the most supportive data and can be recommended to patients with confidence. From a practical standpoint, general education on CRF is something that most care providers can readily offer patients as part of routine care. Other interventions that appear promising but are as yet lacking convincing evidence include mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, and acupuncture. Reiki, Qigong, hypnosis, and music therapy may be worthy of further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-318
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Journal (United States)
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cancer survivorship
  • Cancer-related fatigue
  • Fatigue
  • Nonpharmacologic
  • Palliative
  • Symptom management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nonpharmacologic approach to fatigue in patients with cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this