Noninvasive assessment of cardiac outut by brachial occlusion-cuff technique: Comparison with the open-circuit acetylene washin method

Pavol Sajgalik, Vaclav Kremen, Alex R. Carlson, Vratislav Fabian, Chul Ho Kim, Courtney Wheatley, Vaclav Gerla, John A. Schirger, Thomas P Olson, Bruce David Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiac output (CO) assessment as a basic hemodynamic parameter has been of interest in exercise physiology, cardiology, and anesthesiology. Noninvasive techniques available are technically challenging, and thus difficult to use outside of a clinical or laboratory setting. We propose a novel method of noninvasive CO assessment using a single, upper-arm cuff. The method uses the arterial pressure pulse wave signal acquired from the brachial artery during 20-s intervals of suprasystolic occlusion. This method was evaluated in a cohort of 12 healthy individuals (age, 27.7 ± 5.4 yr, 50% men) and compared with an established method for noninvasive CO assessment, the open-circuit acetylene method (OpCirc) at rest, and during low- to moderate-intensity exercise. CO increased from rest to exercise (rest, 7.4 ± 0.8 vs. 7.2 ± 0.8; low, 9.8 ± 1.8 vs. 9.9 ± 2.0; moderate, 14.1 ± 2.8 vs. 14.8 ± 3.2 l/min) as assessed by the cuff-occlusion and OpCirc techniques, respectively. The average error of experimental technique compared with OpCirc was -0.25 ± 1.02 l/min, Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.96 (rest + exercise), and 0.21 ± 0.42 l/min with Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.87 (rest only). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated good agreement between methods (within 95% boundaries); the reproducibility coefficient (RPC) = 0.84 l/min with R2 = 0.75 at rest and RPC = 2 l/min with R2 = 0.92 at rest and during exercise, respectively. In comparison with an established method to quantify CO, the cuff-occlusion method provides similar measures at rest and with light to moderate exercise. Thus, we believe this method has the potential to be used as a new, noninvasive method for assessing CO during exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1319-1325
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Acetylene
Arm
Cardiac Output
Exercise
Anesthesiology
Brachial Artery
Cardiology
Arterial Pressure
Hemodynamics
Light

Keywords

  • Brachial cuff
  • Cardiac output
  • Noninvasive
  • Occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Noninvasive assessment of cardiac outut by brachial occlusion-cuff technique : Comparison with the open-circuit acetylene washin method. / Sajgalik, Pavol; Kremen, Vaclav; Carlson, Alex R.; Fabian, Vratislav; Kim, Chul Ho; Wheatley, Courtney; Gerla, Vaclav; Schirger, John A.; Olson, Thomas P; Johnson, Bruce David.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 121, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1319-1325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sajgalik, Pavol ; Kremen, Vaclav ; Carlson, Alex R. ; Fabian, Vratislav ; Kim, Chul Ho ; Wheatley, Courtney ; Gerla, Vaclav ; Schirger, John A. ; Olson, Thomas P ; Johnson, Bruce David. / Noninvasive assessment of cardiac outut by brachial occlusion-cuff technique : Comparison with the open-circuit acetylene washin method. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2016 ; Vol. 121, No. 6. pp. 1319-1325.
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abstract = "Cardiac output (CO) assessment as a basic hemodynamic parameter has been of interest in exercise physiology, cardiology, and anesthesiology. Noninvasive techniques available are technically challenging, and thus difficult to use outside of a clinical or laboratory setting. We propose a novel method of noninvasive CO assessment using a single, upper-arm cuff. The method uses the arterial pressure pulse wave signal acquired from the brachial artery during 20-s intervals of suprasystolic occlusion. This method was evaluated in a cohort of 12 healthy individuals (age, 27.7 ± 5.4 yr, 50{\%} men) and compared with an established method for noninvasive CO assessment, the open-circuit acetylene method (OpCirc) at rest, and during low- to moderate-intensity exercise. CO increased from rest to exercise (rest, 7.4 ± 0.8 vs. 7.2 ± 0.8; low, 9.8 ± 1.8 vs. 9.9 ± 2.0; moderate, 14.1 ± 2.8 vs. 14.8 ± 3.2 l/min) as assessed by the cuff-occlusion and OpCirc techniques, respectively. The average error of experimental technique compared with OpCirc was -0.25 ± 1.02 l/min, Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.96 (rest + exercise), and 0.21 ± 0.42 l/min with Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.87 (rest only). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated good agreement between methods (within 95{\%} boundaries); the reproducibility coefficient (RPC) = 0.84 l/min with R2 = 0.75 at rest and RPC = 2 l/min with R2 = 0.92 at rest and during exercise, respectively. In comparison with an established method to quantify CO, the cuff-occlusion method provides similar measures at rest and with light to moderate exercise. Thus, we believe this method has the potential to be used as a new, noninvasive method for assessing CO during exercise.",
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AU - Kim, Chul Ho

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