Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: Mechanisms and risk factors

Barry P. Boden, Frances T. Sheehan, Joseph S. Torg, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significant advances have recently been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Most ACL injuries involve minimal to no contact. Female athletes sustain a two- to eightfold greater rate of injury than do their male counterparts. Recent videotape analyses demonstrate significant differences in average leg and trunk positions during injury compared with control subjects. These findings as well as those of cadaveric and MRI studies indicate that axial compressive forces are a critical component in noncontact ACL injury. A complete understanding of the forces and risk factors associated with noncontact ACL injury should lead to the development of improved preventive strategies for this devastating injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-527
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume18
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Videotape Recording
Athletes
Leg
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries : Mechanisms and risk factors. / Boden, Barry P.; Sheehan, Frances T.; Torg, Joseph S.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Vol. 18, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 520-527.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Boden, Barry P. ; Sheehan, Frances T. ; Torg, Joseph S. ; Hewett, Timothy. / Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries : Mechanisms and risk factors. In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2010 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 520-527.
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