Non-small-cell lung cancer in elderly patients

A discussion of treatment options

Ajeet Gajra, Aminah Jatoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is a disease of the elderly. In older patients, the management of a malignancy as complex and potentially as lethal as lung cancer is challenging. Despite the fact that a large proportion of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer are elderly, information remains scant on how best to treat these patients. The goal of this review is to discuss the published literature and to provide guidance on how to treat elderly patients within three broad stages: (1) metastatic cancer, (2) early-stage cancer after surgery, and (3) locally advanced inoperable cancer. Because decisions on how and when to prescribe systemic treatment can be particularly difficult, this review focuses heavily on chemotherapy-related treatment decisions with some discussion of emerging data on the use of the comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2562-2569
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume32
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2014

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Geriatric Assessment
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Non-small-cell lung cancer in elderly patients : A discussion of treatment options. / Gajra, Ajeet; Jatoi, Aminah.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 32, No. 24, 20.08.2014, p. 2562-2569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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