Non-pharmacologic interventions improve comfort and experience among older adults in the Emergency Department

Isabella M. Lichen, Michelle J. Berning, Susan M. Bower, Jessica A. Stanich, Molly M. Jeffery, Ronna L. Campbell, Laura E. Walker, Fernanda Bellolio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Determine if a comfort cart would improve older adults' comfort and facilitate communication during Emergency Department (ED) visits. Methods: A comfort cart containing low-cost, non-pharmacological interventions to improve patient comfort and ability to communicate (e.g., hearing amplifiers, reading glasses) were made available to patients aged ≥65 years. Patients and clinicians were surveyed to assess effectiveness. We followed the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence: SQUIRE 2.0 guidelines. Results: Three hundred patients and 100 providers were surveyed. Among patients, 98.0%, 95.1%, and 67.5% somewhat or strongly agreed that the comfort cart improved comfort, overall experience, and independence, respectively. Among providers, 97.0%, 95.0%, 87.0%, and 83% somewhat or strongly agreed that the comfort cart provided comfort, improved patient satisfaction, increased ability to give compassionate care, and increased patient orientation. Conclusion: The comfort cart was an affordable and effective intervention that improved patients' comfort by facilitating communication, wellbeing, and compassionate care delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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