No interaction of body mass index and smoking on diabetes mellitus risk in elderly women

Michael W. Cullen, Jon Owen Ebbert, Robert A. Vierkant, Alice H. Wang, James R Cerhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We sought to assess the interaction of smoking and body mass index (BMI) on diabetes risk. Methods: We analyzed data from a community-based prospective cohort of 41,836 women from Iowa who completed a baseline survey in 1986 and five subsequent surveys through 2004. The final analysis included 36,839 participants. Results: At baseline (1986), there were 66% never smokers, 20% former smokers, and 14% current smokers. Subjects represented 40% normal weight, 38% overweight, and 22% obese individuals. Compared to normal weight women, the hazard ratio (HR) for diabetes was increased in overweight (HR 1.96; 95% CI 1.75-2.19) and obese subjects (HR 3.58; 95% CI 3.19-4.02). The hazard ratio for diabetes increased in a dose-dependent manner with smoking intensity. Compared to never smokers, former smokers had a higher risk for diabetes (HR 1.22; 95% CI 1.11-1.34). Among current smokers, the hazard ratio for diabetes was 1.21 (95% CI 0.95-1.53) for 1-19 pack-year smokers, 1.33 (95% CI 1.12-1.57) for 20-39 pack-year smokers, and 1.45 (95% CI 1.23-1.71) for ≥ 40 pack-year smokers. Similar trends were observed when the results were stratified by BMI. A test of interaction between BMI and smoking on diabetes risk was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that smoking increases diabetes risk through a BMI-independent mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-78
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

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Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Weights and Measures
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Epidemiology
  • Obesity
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

No interaction of body mass index and smoking on diabetes mellitus risk in elderly women. / Cullen, Michael W.; Ebbert, Jon Owen; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang, Alice H.; Cerhan, James R.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 74-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cullen, Michael W. ; Ebbert, Jon Owen ; Vierkant, Robert A. ; Wang, Alice H. ; Cerhan, James R. / No interaction of body mass index and smoking on diabetes mellitus risk in elderly women. In: Preventive Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 74-78.
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