No evidence for cognitive dysfunction or depression in patients with mild restless legs syndrome

Erika Driver-Dunckley, Donald Connor, Joe Hentz, Marwan Sabbagh, Nina Silverberg, Jose Hernandez, Linda Vedders, Virgilio Gerald Evidente, Holly Shill, John Caviness, Charles Adler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Restless legs syndrome is a common disoder that may interrupt sleep and has been reported to produce daytime fatigue and/or mood changes. This study assessed whether patients with RLS have more cognitive dysfunction and depression than individuals of the same age and education who do not have RLS. The study showed that older individuals with mild RLS for at least 1 year do not have cognitive dysfunction and are not depressed compared with a control group of similar age and education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1843-1847
Number of pages5
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2009

Keywords

  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Restless legs syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Driver-Dunckley, E., Connor, D., Hentz, J., Sabbagh, M., Silverberg, N., Hernandez, J., Vedders, L., Evidente, V. G., Shill, H., Caviness, J., & Adler, C. (2009). No evidence for cognitive dysfunction or depression in patients with mild restless legs syndrome. Movement Disorders, 24(12), 1843-1847. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.22701