No benefit of patient-specific instrumentation in TKA on functional and gait outcomes: A randomized clinical trial

Matthew P. Abdel, Sébastien Parratte, Guillaume Blanc, Matthieu Ollivier, Vincent Pomero, Elke Viehweger, Jean Noël A. Argenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although some clinical reports suggest patient-specific instrumentation in TKA may improve alignment, reduce surgical time, and lower hospital costs, it is unknown whether it improves pain- and function-related outcomes and gait. Questions/purposes: We hypothesized that TKA performed with patient-specific instrumentation would improve patient-reported outcomes measured by validated scoring tools and level gait as ascertained with three-dimensional (3-D) analysis compared with conventional instrumentation 3 months after surgery. Methods: We randomized 40 patients into two groups using either patient-specific instrumentation or conventional instrumentation. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and 3 months after surgery. Assessment tools included subjective functional outcome and quality-of-life (QOL) scores using validated questionnaires (New Knee Society Score

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2468-2476
Number of pages9
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Volume472
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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