Nicotine stimulates Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) activity in vitro but does not affect transcription of endothelial NOS in vivo

B. H. Tonnessen, R. H. Hurt, V. M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous results from our laboratory demonstrate that nicotine, via smoking, nasal spray, or transdermal patch, modulates levels of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma. Experiments were designed to determine whether or not nicotine affects plasma nitric oxide through transcription or activity of the enzyme endothelial NOS (ecNOS). ecNOS was isolated from aortic endothelial cells of untreated dogs. mRNA was extracted from the aortic endothelial cells of untreated dogs or dogs treated for five weeks with transdermal nicotine (11 mg/day or 44 mg/day). Activity for NOS (measured as pmol L-[3H] citrulline produced/mg protein/hr) was determined in the absence or presence of nicotine (10-6 to 10-3 M). mRNA for ecNOS was transcribed to c-DNA by reverse transcriptase and quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Nicotine increased NOS activity in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. Nicotine treatment for five weeks did not affect relative quantities of mRNA for ecNOS. Those data demonstrate for the first time a direct effect of nicotine on NOS activity. Furthermore, transdermal nicotine at concentrations used for smoking cessation in humans does not affect transcription of ecNOS endothelial cells in dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)A1111
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nicotine stimulates Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) activity in vitro but does not affect transcription of endothelial NOS in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this