Nicotine metabolite ratio is associated with lozenge use but not quitting in smokeless tobacco users

Jon Owen Ebbert, Herbert H. Severson, Brian G. Danaher, Neal L. Benowitz, Darrell R. Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) of 3'-hydroxycotinine to cotinine is a noninvasive marker of the rate of nicotine metabolism. Fast metabolism (ie, a high NMR) is associated with lower cigarette smoking abstinence rates using transdermal nicotine replacement. We evaluated whether the NMR can be used to predict self-reported nicotine lozenge use and tobacco abstinence among smokeless tobacco users treated for tobacco dependence. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from one arm of a large trial. Participants received quitting support materials and 4-mg nicotine lozenges by mail plus three coaching phone calls. Saliva kits were mailed for collection of saliva samples, which were analyzed for cotinine and 3'-hydroxycotinine. Self-reported tobacco and lozenge use were assessed at 3 months. Analyses were performed using Spearman rank correlation and logistic regression. Results: Of the 160 saliva collection kits mailed, 152 were returned. The NMR was not significantly correlated with the baseline amount of smokeless tobacco used, the number of years of tobacco use, or the level of tobacco dependence as measured by the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Dependency Scale. The NMR was positively correlated with lozenge use (r = 0.21, P =.015), but it did not predict self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months. Conclusions: Fast metabolizers may need to self-administer more nicotine replacement in the form of nicotine lozenges to achieve the same clinical response achieved by slower metabolizers using fewer lozenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-370
Number of pages5
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Smokeless Tobacco
Nicotine
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Tobacco Use
Saliva
Cotinine
Tobacco Use Disorder
Postal Service
Logistic Models
Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nicotine metabolite ratio is associated with lozenge use but not quitting in smokeless tobacco users. / Ebbert, Jon Owen; Severson, Herbert H.; Danaher, Brian G.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2016, p. 366-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ebbert, Jon Owen ; Severson, Herbert H. ; Danaher, Brian G. ; Benowitz, Neal L. ; Schroeder, Darrell R. / Nicotine metabolite ratio is associated with lozenge use but not quitting in smokeless tobacco users. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 366-370.
@article{f742384356c54cba95b368d889a6b4a0,
title = "Nicotine metabolite ratio is associated with lozenge use but not quitting in smokeless tobacco users",
abstract = "Introduction: The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) of 3'-hydroxycotinine to cotinine is a noninvasive marker of the rate of nicotine metabolism. Fast metabolism (ie, a high NMR) is associated with lower cigarette smoking abstinence rates using transdermal nicotine replacement. We evaluated whether the NMR can be used to predict self-reported nicotine lozenge use and tobacco abstinence among smokeless tobacco users treated for tobacco dependence. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from one arm of a large trial. Participants received quitting support materials and 4-mg nicotine lozenges by mail plus three coaching phone calls. Saliva kits were mailed for collection of saliva samples, which were analyzed for cotinine and 3'-hydroxycotinine. Self-reported tobacco and lozenge use were assessed at 3 months. Analyses were performed using Spearman rank correlation and logistic regression. Results: Of the 160 saliva collection kits mailed, 152 were returned. The NMR was not significantly correlated with the baseline amount of smokeless tobacco used, the number of years of tobacco use, or the level of tobacco dependence as measured by the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Dependency Scale. The NMR was positively correlated with lozenge use (r = 0.21, P =.015), but it did not predict self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months. Conclusions: Fast metabolizers may need to self-administer more nicotine replacement in the form of nicotine lozenges to achieve the same clinical response achieved by slower metabolizers using fewer lozenges.",
author = "Ebbert, {Jon Owen} and Severson, {Herbert H.} and Danaher, {Brian G.} and Benowitz, {Neal L.} and Schroeder, {Darrell R.}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1093/ntr/ntv102",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "366--370",
journal = "Nicotine and Tobacco Research",
issn = "1462-2203",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nicotine metabolite ratio is associated with lozenge use but not quitting in smokeless tobacco users

AU - Ebbert, Jon Owen

AU - Severson, Herbert H.

AU - Danaher, Brian G.

AU - Benowitz, Neal L.

AU - Schroeder, Darrell R.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Introduction: The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) of 3'-hydroxycotinine to cotinine is a noninvasive marker of the rate of nicotine metabolism. Fast metabolism (ie, a high NMR) is associated with lower cigarette smoking abstinence rates using transdermal nicotine replacement. We evaluated whether the NMR can be used to predict self-reported nicotine lozenge use and tobacco abstinence among smokeless tobacco users treated for tobacco dependence. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from one arm of a large trial. Participants received quitting support materials and 4-mg nicotine lozenges by mail plus three coaching phone calls. Saliva kits were mailed for collection of saliva samples, which were analyzed for cotinine and 3'-hydroxycotinine. Self-reported tobacco and lozenge use were assessed at 3 months. Analyses were performed using Spearman rank correlation and logistic regression. Results: Of the 160 saliva collection kits mailed, 152 were returned. The NMR was not significantly correlated with the baseline amount of smokeless tobacco used, the number of years of tobacco use, or the level of tobacco dependence as measured by the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Dependency Scale. The NMR was positively correlated with lozenge use (r = 0.21, P =.015), but it did not predict self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months. Conclusions: Fast metabolizers may need to self-administer more nicotine replacement in the form of nicotine lozenges to achieve the same clinical response achieved by slower metabolizers using fewer lozenges.

AB - Introduction: The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) of 3'-hydroxycotinine to cotinine is a noninvasive marker of the rate of nicotine metabolism. Fast metabolism (ie, a high NMR) is associated with lower cigarette smoking abstinence rates using transdermal nicotine replacement. We evaluated whether the NMR can be used to predict self-reported nicotine lozenge use and tobacco abstinence among smokeless tobacco users treated for tobacco dependence. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from one arm of a large trial. Participants received quitting support materials and 4-mg nicotine lozenges by mail plus three coaching phone calls. Saliva kits were mailed for collection of saliva samples, which were analyzed for cotinine and 3'-hydroxycotinine. Self-reported tobacco and lozenge use were assessed at 3 months. Analyses were performed using Spearman rank correlation and logistic regression. Results: Of the 160 saliva collection kits mailed, 152 were returned. The NMR was not significantly correlated with the baseline amount of smokeless tobacco used, the number of years of tobacco use, or the level of tobacco dependence as measured by the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Dependency Scale. The NMR was positively correlated with lozenge use (r = 0.21, P =.015), but it did not predict self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 months. Conclusions: Fast metabolizers may need to self-administer more nicotine replacement in the form of nicotine lozenges to achieve the same clinical response achieved by slower metabolizers using fewer lozenges.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84962885307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84962885307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ntr/ntv102

DO - 10.1093/ntr/ntv102

M3 - Article

C2 - 25977408

AN - SCOPUS:84962885307

VL - 18

SP - 366

EP - 370

JO - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 3

ER -