Nicotine dependence treatment: Perceived health status improvement with 1-year continuous smoking abstinence

Ivana T. Croghan, Darrell R. Schroeder, J. Taylor Hays, Kay M. Eberman, Christi A. Patten, Emily J. Berg, Richard D. Hurt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study evaluated change in health status as a function of change in smoking status among patients treated clinically for nicotine dependence by comparing overall perceived health status of patients who abstained from cigarettes for 1 year versus those who smoked continuously for 1 year. Methods: Patients from the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center completed a quality-of-life questionnaire (SF-36) following their consultation for nicotine dependence (baseline). At 1 year post-intervention, patients were mailed a follow-up survey that included the SF-36 and items assessing interval smoking history. Study patients included those who self-reported continuous smoking (n = 60) and those reporting continuous smoking abstinence for the entire follow-up year (n = 146). Data from SF-36 scales at 1 year were analysed using analysis of covariance with baseline scale scores serving as covariates along with baseline characteristics that differed significantly between groups. Results: Compared with those who continued to smoke, patients who were continuously abstinent from smoking for the entire year had more improvement in perceived health status for the SF-36 mental composite scale (P = 0.009) and for the SF-36 subscales for role limitations (P < 0.001 and P = 0.017 for emotional and physical role limitations, respectively), social functioning (P = 0.010) and general health (P = 0.013). Conclusions: Smokers treated for nicotine dependence who stop smoking for a year report more improvement in-quality-of-life compared with those who continue to smoke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-255
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Keywords

  • Nicotine dependence
  • Quality-of-life
  • SF-36
  • Smoking
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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