Newer antidepressants and gabapentin for hot flashes: A discussion of trial duration

Charles Lawrence Loprinzi, Brent Diekmann, Paul J. Novotny, Vered Stearns, Jeff A Sloan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Information regarding the ideal length of hot flash trials is scarce. In the literature, hot flash trial durations have commonly varied from 4 to 12 weeks. This article is devoted to providing scientific data to better ascertain how long it is necessary to conduct hot flash trials with newer centrally acting agents. Methods: Individual participant data were collected from all known published, through December 2007, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trials regarding the use of newer antidepressants and gabapentin for hot flash relief. Trials that studied periods longer than 4 weeks were included for this project. Profile analysis was applied to the hot flash activity longitudinal data for each study individually, allowing a comparison of data collected for 6 to 12 treatment weeks versus data collected for only 4 treatment weeks. Results: Ten studies were identified, five of them fulfilled the eligibility criteria for this investigation, three evaluating gabapentin, and two newer antidepressants. Flatness tests from a profile analysis did not provide any evidence that hot flash activity increased or decreased between week 4 and time periods up to 12 weeks. Conclusions: Changes in hot flash scores from newer antidepressants and gabapentin are apparent within 4 weeks of therapy. Available data indicate that hot flash treatment efficacy, compared with that of placebo, remains stable for up to 12 weeks of follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-887
Number of pages5
JournalMenopause
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Hot Flashes
Antidepressive Agents
Placebos
gabapentin
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • Gabapentin
  • Hot flash
  • Study duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Newer antidepressants and gabapentin for hot flashes : A discussion of trial duration. / Loprinzi, Charles Lawrence; Diekmann, Brent; Novotny, Paul J.; Stearns, Vered; Sloan, Jeff A.

In: Menopause, Vol. 16, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 883-887.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loprinzi, Charles Lawrence ; Diekmann, Brent ; Novotny, Paul J. ; Stearns, Vered ; Sloan, Jeff A. / Newer antidepressants and gabapentin for hot flashes : A discussion of trial duration. In: Menopause. 2009 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 883-887.
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