New surgical techniques: Implications for the cardiac anesthesiologist: Mini-thoracotomy for coronary revascularization without cardiopulmonary bypass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Minimally invasive coronary artery revascularization is a new technique in cardiac surgery of interest to both the medical profession and the general public. Although surgical methods are still evolving, two general approaches are used. The most prevalent technique is bypass of the left anterior descending coronary artery with the left internal mammary artery through a short left perasternal incision. Operation is performed on the beating heart under direct vision without the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. The procedure is termed 'minimally invasive direct vision coronary artery bypass (MIDCAB)'. The second general approach is videoscopic, with multiple ports for exposure and manipulation. This method employs cardiopulmonary bypass and is more timeconsuming than MIDCAB. These novel techniques raise new challenges for cardiac surgeons and anesthesiologists. An important goal of minimally invasive revascularization is to reduce pain end length of hospitalization and hence provide an attractive alternative to catheter techniques, in terms of both cost and patient acceptance. This report describes current protocols for patient selection and perioperative anesthetic management, along with early results in the use of this technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-9
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume11
Issue number2 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • MIDCAB
  • cardiac anesthesia
  • mini-thoracotomy
  • minimally invasive coronary artery bypass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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