Neuromuscular training techniques to target deficits before return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Gregory D. Myer, Mark V. Paterno, Kevin R. Ford, Timothy Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical intervention and early-phase rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have undergone a relatively rapid and global evolution over the past 25 years. Despite the advances that have significantly improved outcomes, decreases in healthcare coverage (limited visits allowed for physical therapy) have increased the role of the strength and conditioning specialist in the rehabilitation of athletes returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. In addition, there is an absence of standardized, objective criteria to accurately assess an athlete's ability to progress through the end stages of rehabilitation and safely return to sport. The purpose of this Scientific Commentary is to present an example of a progressive, end-stage return to sport protocol that is targeted to measured deficits of neuromuscular control, strength, power, and functional symmetry that are rehabilitative landmarks after ACL reconstruction. The proposed return to sport training protocol incorporates quantitative measurement tools that will provide the athlete with objective feedback and targeted goal setting. Objective feedback and targeted goal setting may aid the strength and conditioning specialist with exercise selection and progression. In addition, a rationale for exercise selection is outlined to provide the strength and conditioning specialist with a flexible decision-making approach that will aid in the modification of return to sport training to meet the individual athlete's abilities and to target objectively measured deficits. This algorithmic approach may improve the potential for athletes to return to sport after ACL reconstruction at the optimal performance level and with minimized risk of reinjury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-1014
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Athletes
Teaching
Aptitude
Rehabilitation
Exercise
Sports
Decision Making
Return to Sport
Delivery of Health Care
Conditioning (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Acl
  • Knee
  • Knee rehabilitation
  • Lower extremity
  • Sports reentry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Neuromuscular training techniques to target deficits before return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. / Myer, Gregory D.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Hewett, Timothy.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 22, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 987-1014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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