Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ): Aging

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Aging is associated with reduced physical activity, a loss of motor neurons, and a decrease in muscle fiber size (sarcopenia), all of which may affect long-term plasticity of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). For each of these factors, it is essential to consider motor unit (muscle fiber) type since the properties of motor neurons and muscle fibers are precisely matched and selective motor unit recruitment is a primary mechanism by which the nervous system controls muscle contraction. This article examines age-related changes in properties of different motor unit types and how these may affect structural and functional remodeling of NMJs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Neuroscience
PublisherElsevier Ltd
Pages569-573
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780080450469
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Neuromuscular Junction
Motor Neurons
Muscles
Neurophysiological Recruitment
Sarcopenia
Muscle Contraction
Nervous System

Keywords

  • Age
  • Aging
  • Morphological adaptations
  • Motor units
  • Muscle fiber type
  • Neuromuscular junction
  • Plasticity
  • Recruitment
  • Senescence
  • Skeletal muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sieck, G. C., & Mantilla, C. B. (2010). Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ): Aging. In Encyclopedia of Neuroscience (pp. 569-573). Elsevier Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008045046-9.01268-7

Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) : Aging. / Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos Bernardo.

Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Elsevier Ltd, 2010. p. 569-573.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sieck, GC & Mantilla, CB 2010, Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ): Aging. in Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Elsevier Ltd, pp. 569-573. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008045046-9.01268-7
Sieck GC, Mantilla CB. Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ): Aging. In Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Elsevier Ltd. 2010. p. 569-573 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008045046-9.01268-7
Sieck, Gary C ; Mantilla, Carlos Bernardo. / Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) : Aging. Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Elsevier Ltd, 2010. pp. 569-573
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