Neurocognitive efficiency following left temporal lobectomy

Standard versus limited resection

R. L. Wolf, R. J. Ivnik, K. A. Hirschorn, F. W. Sharbrough, Gregory D Cascino, W. R. Marsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decreased memory and learning efficiency may follow left temporal lobectomy. Debate exists as to whether the acquired deficit is related to the size of the surgical resection. This study addresses this question by comparing changes in cognitive performance to the extent of resection of both mesial temporal structures and lateral cortex. The authors retrospectively reviewed 47 right-handed patients who underwent left temporal lobectomy for medically intractable seizures. To examine the effects of the extent of mesial resection, the patients were divided into two groups: those with resection at the anterior 1 to 2 cm of mesial structures versus those with resection greater than 2 cm. To examine the effects of the extent of lateral cortical resection, patients were again divided into two groups: those with lateral cortex resections of 4 cm or less versus those with resections greater than 4 cm. Statistical analyses showed no difference in cognitive outcome between the groups defined by the extent of mesial resection. Likewise, no difference in cognitive outcome was seen between the groups defined by the extent of lateral cortical resection. Associated data analyses did, however, reveal a negative correlation of cognitive change with patient age at seizure onset. These results showed that the neurocognitive consequences of extended mesial resections were similar to those of limited mesial resections, and that the neurocognitive consequences of extended lateral cortical resections were similar to those of limited lateral cortical resections. The risk of cognitive impairment depends more on age at seizure onset than on the extent of mesial or lateral resection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-83
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume79
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1993

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Seizures
Efficiency
Age of Onset
Patient Rights
Learning
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • cognitive impairment
  • prognostic feature
  • seizure
  • temporal lobectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Wolf, R. L., Ivnik, R. J., Hirschorn, K. A., Sharbrough, F. W., Cascino, G. D., & Marsh, W. R. (1993). Neurocognitive efficiency following left temporal lobectomy: Standard versus limited resection. Journal of Neurosurgery, 79(1), 76-83.

Neurocognitive efficiency following left temporal lobectomy : Standard versus limited resection. / Wolf, R. L.; Ivnik, R. J.; Hirschorn, K. A.; Sharbrough, F. W.; Cascino, Gregory D; Marsh, W. R.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 79, No. 1, 1993, p. 76-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolf, RL, Ivnik, RJ, Hirschorn, KA, Sharbrough, FW, Cascino, GD & Marsh, WR 1993, 'Neurocognitive efficiency following left temporal lobectomy: Standard versus limited resection', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 76-83.
Wolf, R. L. ; Ivnik, R. J. ; Hirschorn, K. A. ; Sharbrough, F. W. ; Cascino, Gregory D ; Marsh, W. R. / Neurocognitive efficiency following left temporal lobectomy : Standard versus limited resection. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1993 ; Vol. 79, No. 1. pp. 76-83.
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