Neither serum ferritin nor the number of red blood cell transfusions affect overall survival in refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts

Cheng E. Chee, David P. Steensma, Wenting Wu, Curtis A. Hanson, Ayalew Tefferi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a retrospective study of 126 adult patients with French-American- British-defined refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS), staging by the International Prognostic Scoring System was highly predictive of survival outcome (P < 0.0001). In addition, red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirement at diagnosis (P = 0.001), but not the number of RBC units transfused during the disease course (P = 0.17), was independently associated with inferior survival. There were no correlations between survival and serum ferritin level, measured either at diagnosis (median 567 ng/mL, range 16-3,475; P = 0.24) or during follow-up (median 1,108 ng/mL; range 238-43,500; P = 0.72). Similarly, there was no difference in survival when patients were stratified by serum ferritin levels of < or ≥ 1,000 ng/mL at diagnosis or peak serum ferritin levels of <1,000, 1,000-5,000, or >5,000 ng/mL during follow-up. The current study does not support the contention that transfusional hemosiderosis is an adverse prognostic factor in "good risk" myelodysplastic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)611-613
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of hematology
Volume83
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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