Negative affect in victimized children: The roles of social withdrawal, peer rejection, and attitudes toward bullying

Edward J. Dill, Eric M. Vernberg, Peter Fonagy, Stuart W. Twemlow, Bridget K Biggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the validity of mediating pathways in predicting self-assessed negative affect from shyness/social withdrawal, peer rejection, victimization by peers (overt and relational), and the attitude that aggression is legitimate and warranted. Participants were 296 3rd through 5th graders (156 girls, 140 boys) from 10 elementary schools. Self-report measures of victimization, attitudes, and negative affect, and a teacher-report measure of shyness/social withdrawal and peer rejection were completed during the spring semesters of 2 consecutive years. Hierarchical regression analyses supported the mediational model in predicting negative affect at Time 2. However, an increase in negative affect over the 12-month study period was best accounted for by direct effects of increased victimization and changes in attitudes/attributions regarding aggression. Implications for the planning of school interventions designed to interrupt these victimization-maladjustment pathways are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-173
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bullying
Crime Victims
Shyness
Aggression
Self Report
Regression Analysis
Rejection (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Children
  • Cognitive mechanisms
  • Negative affect
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Negative affect in victimized children : The roles of social withdrawal, peer rejection, and attitudes toward bullying. / Dill, Edward J.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W.; Biggs, Bridget K.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 159-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dill, Edward J. ; Vernberg, Eric M. ; Fonagy, Peter ; Twemlow, Stuart W. ; Biggs, Bridget K. / Negative affect in victimized children : The roles of social withdrawal, peer rejection, and attitudes toward bullying. In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 2004 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 159-173.
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