Navigating the pathway to robotic competency in general thoracic surgery

Christopher W. Seder, Stephen D. Cassivi, Dennis A Wigle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although robotic technology has addressed many of the limitations of traditional videoscopic surgery, robotic surgery has not gained widespread acceptance in the general thoracic community. We report our initial robotic surgery experience and propose a structured, competency-based pathway for the development of robotic skills. METHODS: Between December 2008 and February 2012, a total of 79 robot-assisted pulmonary, mediastinal, benign esophageal, or diaphragmatic procedures were performed. Data on patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes were retrospectively collected and analyzed. During the study period, one surgeon and three residents participated in a triphasic, competency-based pathway designed to teach robotic skills. The pathway consisted of individual preclinical learning followed by mentored preclinical exercises and progressive clinical responsibility. RESULTS: The robot-assisted procedures performed included lung resection (n = 38), mediastinal mass resection (n = 19), hiatal or paraesophageal hernia repair (n = 12), and Heller myotomy (n = 7), among others (n = 3). There were no perioperative mortalities, with a 20% complication rate and a 3% readmission rate. Conversion to a thoracoscopic or open approach was required in eight pulmonary resections to facilitate dissection (six) or to control hemorrhage (two). Fewer major perioperative complications were observed in the later half of the experience. All residents who participated in the thoracic surgery robotic pathway perform robot-assisted procedures as part of their clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: Robot-assisted thoracic surgery can be safely learned when skill acquisition is guided by a structured, competency-based pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-189
Number of pages6
JournalInnovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Robotics
Thoracic Surgery
Lung
Herniorrhaphy
Dissection
Thorax
Learning
Exercise
Hemorrhage
Technology
Mortality

Keywords

  • Education, General thoracic surgery
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Robotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Navigating the pathway to robotic competency in general thoracic surgery. / Seder, Christopher W.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Wigle, Dennis A.

In: Innovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2013, p. 184-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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