National trends in emergency department visits and hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in US children

Megan S. Motosue, Fernanda Bellolio, Holly K. Van Houten, Nilay D Shah, Ronna L. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Food is the leading cause of anaphylaxis in children seen in emergency departments in the United States, yet data on emergency department visits and hospitalizations related to food-induced anaphylaxis are limited. The objective of our study was to examine national time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Methods: We conducted an observational study using a national administrative claims database from 2005 through 2014. Participants were younger than 18 years with an emergency department visit or hospitalization for food-induced anaphylaxis. Outcome measures of our study included time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations, including observations (in an emergency department or a hospital unit), inpatient admissions, and intensive care unit admissions. Results: During the study period, participants had 7310 food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits. Emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis increased by 214% (P <.001); the highest rates were in infants and toddlers (age 0-2 years). Rates of emergency department visits significantly increased in all age-groups, with the highest increase in adolescents (age 13-17 years: 413%; P <.001). Peanuts accounted for the highest rates (5.85 per 100 000 in 2014) followed by tree nuts/seeds (4.62 per 100 000 in 2014). The greatest increase in rates of emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis occurred with tree nuts/seeds (373.0% increase during the study period). Conclusions: The incidence of food-induced anaphylaxis has significantly increased over time in children of all ages. Food-induced anaphylaxis in children is an important national public health concern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-544
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Allergy and Immunology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Anaphylaxis
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Food
Nuts
Seeds
Pediatrics
Hospital Units
Observational Studies
Intensive Care Units
Inpatients
Public Health
Age Groups
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Incidence

Keywords

  • children
  • epidemiology
  • food-induced anaphylaxis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

National trends in emergency department visits and hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in US children. / Motosue, Megan S.; Bellolio, Fernanda; Van Houten, Holly K.; Shah, Nilay D; Campbell, Ronna L.

In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.08.2018, p. 538-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{89dfb7ed916643ba975166a954381ac5,
title = "National trends in emergency department visits and hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in US children",
abstract = "Background: Food is the leading cause of anaphylaxis in children seen in emergency departments in the United States, yet data on emergency department visits and hospitalizations related to food-induced anaphylaxis are limited. The objective of our study was to examine national time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Methods: We conducted an observational study using a national administrative claims database from 2005 through 2014. Participants were younger than 18 years with an emergency department visit or hospitalization for food-induced anaphylaxis. Outcome measures of our study included time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations, including observations (in an emergency department or a hospital unit), inpatient admissions, and intensive care unit admissions. Results: During the study period, participants had 7310 food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits. Emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis increased by 214{\%} (P <.001); the highest rates were in infants and toddlers (age 0-2 years). Rates of emergency department visits significantly increased in all age-groups, with the highest increase in adolescents (age 13-17 years: 413{\%}; P <.001). Peanuts accounted for the highest rates (5.85 per 100 000 in 2014) followed by tree nuts/seeds (4.62 per 100 000 in 2014). The greatest increase in rates of emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis occurred with tree nuts/seeds (373.0{\%} increase during the study period). Conclusions: The incidence of food-induced anaphylaxis has significantly increased over time in children of all ages. Food-induced anaphylaxis in children is an important national public health concern.",
keywords = "children, epidemiology, food-induced anaphylaxis",
author = "Motosue, {Megan S.} and Fernanda Bellolio and {Van Houten}, {Holly K.} and Shah, {Nilay D} and Campbell, {Ronna L.}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/pai.12908",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "538--544",
journal = "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology",
issn = "0905-6157",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - National trends in emergency department visits and hospitalizations for food-induced anaphylaxis in US children

AU - Motosue, Megan S.

AU - Bellolio, Fernanda

AU - Van Houten, Holly K.

AU - Shah, Nilay D

AU - Campbell, Ronna L.

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Background: Food is the leading cause of anaphylaxis in children seen in emergency departments in the United States, yet data on emergency department visits and hospitalizations related to food-induced anaphylaxis are limited. The objective of our study was to examine national time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Methods: We conducted an observational study using a national administrative claims database from 2005 through 2014. Participants were younger than 18 years with an emergency department visit or hospitalization for food-induced anaphylaxis. Outcome measures of our study included time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations, including observations (in an emergency department or a hospital unit), inpatient admissions, and intensive care unit admissions. Results: During the study period, participants had 7310 food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits. Emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis increased by 214% (P <.001); the highest rates were in infants and toddlers (age 0-2 years). Rates of emergency department visits significantly increased in all age-groups, with the highest increase in adolescents (age 13-17 years: 413%; P <.001). Peanuts accounted for the highest rates (5.85 per 100 000 in 2014) followed by tree nuts/seeds (4.62 per 100 000 in 2014). The greatest increase in rates of emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis occurred with tree nuts/seeds (373.0% increase during the study period). Conclusions: The incidence of food-induced anaphylaxis has significantly increased over time in children of all ages. Food-induced anaphylaxis in children is an important national public health concern.

AB - Background: Food is the leading cause of anaphylaxis in children seen in emergency departments in the United States, yet data on emergency department visits and hospitalizations related to food-induced anaphylaxis are limited. The objective of our study was to examine national time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Methods: We conducted an observational study using a national administrative claims database from 2005 through 2014. Participants were younger than 18 years with an emergency department visit or hospitalization for food-induced anaphylaxis. Outcome measures of our study included time trends of pediatric food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations, including observations (in an emergency department or a hospital unit), inpatient admissions, and intensive care unit admissions. Results: During the study period, participants had 7310 food-induced anaphylaxis-related emergency department visits. Emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis increased by 214% (P <.001); the highest rates were in infants and toddlers (age 0-2 years). Rates of emergency department visits significantly increased in all age-groups, with the highest increase in adolescents (age 13-17 years: 413%; P <.001). Peanuts accounted for the highest rates (5.85 per 100 000 in 2014) followed by tree nuts/seeds (4.62 per 100 000 in 2014). The greatest increase in rates of emergency department visits for food-induced anaphylaxis occurred with tree nuts/seeds (373.0% increase during the study period). Conclusions: The incidence of food-induced anaphylaxis has significantly increased over time in children of all ages. Food-induced anaphylaxis in children is an important national public health concern.

KW - children

KW - epidemiology

KW - food-induced anaphylaxis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050829430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85050829430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/pai.12908

DO - 10.1111/pai.12908

M3 - Article

C2 - 29663520

AN - SCOPUS:85050829430

VL - 29

SP - 538

EP - 544

JO - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

JF - Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

SN - 0905-6157

IS - 5

ER -