Myoclonus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW This article offers clinicians a strategic approach for making sense of a symptom complex that contains myoclonus. The article presents an evaluation strategy that highly leverages the two major classification schemes of myoclonus. The goal of this article is to link evaluation strategy with diagnosis and treatment of myoclonus. RECENT FINDINGS The growth of medical literature has helped better define myoclonus etiologies. Physiologic study of myoclonus types and etiologies with electrophysiologic testing has provided greater clarity to the pathophysiology of the myoclonus in various diseases. Although studies have been limited, the role of newer treatment agents and methods has made progress. SUMMARY Myoclonus has hundreds of different etiologies. Classification is necessary to evaluate myoclonus efficiently and pragmatically. The classification of myoclonus etiology, which is grouped by different clinical presentations, helps determine the etiology and treatment of the myoclonus. The classification of myoclonus physiology using electrophysiologic test results helps determine the pathophysiology of the myoclonus and can be used to strategize symptomatic treatment approaches. Both basic ancillary testing (including EEG and imaging) and more comprehensive testing may be necessary. Treatment of the underlying etiology is the ideal approach. However, if such treatment is not possible or is delayed, symptomatic treatment guided by the myoclonus physiology should be considered. More controlled study of myoclonus treatment is needed. Further research on myoclonus generation mechanisms should shed light on future treatment possibilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1055-1080
Number of pages26
JournalCONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Myoclonus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

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Myoclonus. / Caviness, John Nathaniel.

In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.08.2019, p. 1055-1080.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Caviness, John Nathaniel. / Myoclonus. In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology. 2019 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 1055-1080.
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