Myeloablative Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplantation Results in Superior Disease-Free Survival for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes with Low/Intermediate but not High Disease Risk Index: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Study

Nelli Bejanyan, Meijie Zhang, Khalid Bo-Subait, Claudio Brunstein, Hailin Wang, Erica D. Warlick, Sergio Giralt, Taiga Nishihori, Rodrigo Martino, Jakob Passweg, Ajoy Dias, Edward Copelan, Gregory Hale, Robert Peter Gale, Melhem Solh, Mohamed A. Kharfan-Dabaja, Miguel Angel Diaz, Siddhartha Ganguly, Steven Gore, Leo F. VerdonckNasheed M. Hossain, Natasha Kekre, Bipin Savani, Michael Byrne, Christopher Kanakry, Mitchell S. Cairo, Stefan Ciurea, Harry C. Schouten, Christopher Bredeson, Reinhold Munker, Hillard Lazarus, Jean Yves Cahn, Marjolein van Der Poel, David Rizzieri, Jean A. Yared, Cesar Freytes, Jan Cerny, Mahmoud Aljurf, Neil D. Palmisiano, Attaphol Pawarode, Vera Ulrike Bacher, Michael R. Grunwald, Sunita Nathan, Baldeep Wirk, Gerhard C. Hildebrandt, Sachiko Seo, Richard F. Olsson, Biju George, Marcos de Lima, Christopher S. Hourigan, Brenda M. Sandmaier, Mark Litzow, Partow Kebriaei, Wael Saber, Daniel Weisdorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Compared with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), myeloablative conditioning (MAC) is generally associated with lower relapse risk after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, disease-specific risk factors in AML/MDS can further inform when MAC and RIC may yield differential outcomes. We analyzed HCT outcomes stratified by the Disease Risk Index (DRI) in 4387 adults (age 40 to 65 years) to identify the impact of conditioning intensity. In the low/intermediate-risk DRI cohort, RIC was associated with lower nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (hazard ratio [HR], .74; 95% confidence interval [CI], .62 to .88; P < .001) but significantly greater relapse risk (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.76; P < .001) and thus inferior disease-free survival (DFS) (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.33; P = .001). In the high/very high-risk DRI cohort, RIC was associated with marginally lower NRM (HR, .83; 95% CI, .68 to 1.00; P = .051) and significantly higher relapse risk (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.41; P = .002), leading to similar DFS using either RIC or MAC. These data support MAC over RIC as the preferred conditioning intensity for patients with AML/MDS with low/intermediate-risk DRI, but with a similar benefit as RIC in high/very high-risk DRI. Novel MAC regimens with less toxicity could benefit all patients, but more potent antineoplastic approaches are needed for the high/very-high risk DRI group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • AML
  • DRI
  • MDS
  • Myeloablative
  • RIC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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