Multiple Sclerosis Is Rare in Epstein–Barr Virus–Seronegative Children with Central Nervous System Inflammatory Demyelination

Bardia Nourbakhsh, Christian Cordano, Carlo Asteggiano, Klemens Ruprecht, Carolin Otto, Alice Rutatangwa, Allysa Lui, Janace Hart, Eoin P. Flanagan, Judith A. James, Emmanuelle Waubant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is hypothesized to be a prerequisite for multiple sclerosis (MS), up to 15% of children with a diagnosis of MS were reported to be EBV-seronegative. When re-evaluating 25 EBV-seronegative children out of 189 pediatric patients with a diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome/MS, we found anti–myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody in 11 of 25 (44%) EBV-seronegative but only 9 of 164 (5.5%, p < 0.001) EBV-seropositive patients. After critical review, MS remained a plausible diagnosis in only 4 of 14 EBV-seronegative/MOG antibody–negative patients. In children with an MS-like presentation, EBV seronegativity should alert clinicians to consider diagnoses other than MS, especially MOG-antibody disease. ANN NEUROL 2021.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of neurology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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