Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery

Benjamin Brinkmann, Vlastimil Sulc

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Resective surgery in MRI-negative epilepsy results in poorer outcomes and a higher rate of recurrence compared to cases with a structural lesion visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As many as 26% overall and 46% of extratemporal (1) patients undergoing epilepsy surgery have negative MRI, and in these cases functional studies, including positron emission tomography (PET), ictal and interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), functional MRI (fMRI), and chronic intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring are often essential for localization of the epileptogenic zone. In order to coalesce the results from these disparate modalities around a coherent epileptogenic hypothesis to guide resective surgery, the functional data must be spatially aligned into a single coordinate system, typically corresponding to the patient’s high-resolution T1-weighted MRI, to ultimately guide the resection plan. In addition, improvements to the sensitivity and specificity of functional modalities are often achievable by comparison of patient scans to spatially varying statistical metrics of normality derived from measurements of normal, or nonepileptic, subjects. For a group analysis, it is necessary to transform all data to one common template space. Recent results in cerebral blood flow mapping with ictal–interictal subtraction SPECT show significant improvement in localization when patient scans are evaluated in the context of paired resting scans of normal individuals (2,3). Statistical parametric mapping of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans in comparison to normals has been shown to improve the localizing capability of PET in epilepsy (4,5). The development of novel receptor PET tracers has also furthered the study of epilepsy via PET, and SPM will likely prove useful as normal scans become available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMRI-Negative Epilepsy
Subtitle of host publicationEvaluation and Surgical Management
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages80-89
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781139525312
ISBN (Print)9781107034235
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Positron-Emission Tomography
Epilepsy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Stroke
Recurrence
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Brinkmann, B., & Sulc, V. (2015). Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery. In MRI-Negative Epilepsy: Evaluation and Surgical Management (pp. 80-89). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139525312.010

Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery. / Brinkmann, Benjamin; Sulc, Vlastimil.

MRI-Negative Epilepsy: Evaluation and Surgical Management. Cambridge University Press, 2015. p. 80-89.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Brinkmann, B & Sulc, V 2015, Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery. in MRI-Negative Epilepsy: Evaluation and Surgical Management. Cambridge University Press, pp. 80-89. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139525312.010
Brinkmann B, Sulc V. Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery. In MRI-Negative Epilepsy: Evaluation and Surgical Management. Cambridge University Press. 2015. p. 80-89 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139525312.010
Brinkmann, Benjamin ; Sulc, Vlastimil. / Multimodality image coregistration for MRI-negative epilepsy surgery. MRI-Negative Epilepsy: Evaluation and Surgical Management. Cambridge University Press, 2015. pp. 80-89
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