Multidimensional visualization in echocardiography: An introduction

James F Greenleaf, Marek Belohlavek, T. C. Gerber, D. A. Foley, J. B. Seward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

X-ray films depict three-dimensional objects as shadows in a two- dimensional plane; thus, objects become superimposed. Computed tomography and other types of tomographic imaging, such as ultrasonography, acquire two- dimensional images of a material property within a thin slice. Sequential adjacent two-dimensional tomograms can be used to construct three-dimensional displays of objects. Visualization, a field of computer science, enables scientists to measure image attributes (extraction of features), identify features (classification), separate objects from one another (segmentation), and produce comprehensible, information-dense images from three-dimensional data sets (rendering). A three-dimensional rendering of the heart can be used to represent only one component of the heart, such as the atrial septum or the ventricular chamber, and can be shaded or colored to enhance comprehension. Three-dimensional images rendered sequentially over time result in a dynamic four-dimensional display. This report describes multidimensional visualization of objects and tissues and specifically discusses examples from echocardiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-220
Number of pages8
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume68
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993

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Three-Dimensional Imaging
Echocardiography
Atrial Septum
X-Ray Film
Ultrasonography
Tomography
Datasets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Multidimensional visualization in echocardiography : An introduction. / Greenleaf, James F; Belohlavek, Marek; Gerber, T. C.; Foley, D. A.; Seward, J. B.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 68, No. 3, 1993, p. 213-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenleaf, James F ; Belohlavek, Marek ; Gerber, T. C. ; Foley, D. A. ; Seward, J. B. / Multidimensional visualization in echocardiography : An introduction. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1993 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 213-220.
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