MRI of infiltrative lung disease: Comparison with pathologic findings

S. L. Primack, J. R. Mayo, T. E. Hartman, R. R. Miller, N. L. Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Our goal was to compare MRI with pathologic findings in patients with chronic infiltrative lung disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 22 consecutive patients who had MRI and lung biopsy performed within 21 days (median 4 days). Fifteen patients had open lung biopsy: five with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, three with extrinsic allergic alveolitis, and seven with miscellaneous conditions. Seven patients had transbronchial biopsy: four with sarcoidosis and three with miscellaneous conditions. All patients had 1.5 T MRI with cardiac-gated T1-, proton density-, and T2- weighted SE sequences. Results: The predominant patterns of abnormality seen on MR included parenchymal opacification (n = 12), parenchymal opacification and reticulation (n = 2), reticulation (n = 3), nodularity (n = 3), and interlobular septal thickening (n = 1); normal findings were found in 1. The 14 patients with parenchymal opacification included 9 with ground-glass intensity and 5 with consolidation. In 12 of these 14 patients the parenchymal opacification represented an active inflammatory process including alveolitis, pneumonia, and granulomatous inflammation, while in 2 patients it represented fibrosis. Reticulation was shown to represent fibrosis in five of five cases. The three patients with nodules had sarcoidosis. Conclusion: The MR findings correlate closely with those seen on lung biopsy. Parenchymal opacification on MR usually indicates the presence of potentially reversible disease, while reticulation usually indicates irreversible fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-238
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Tomography
Volume18
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lung Diseases
Biopsy
Fibrosis
Sarcoidosis
Lung
Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Glass
Protons
Pneumonia
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Lungs, diseases
  • Magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Primack, S. L., Mayo, J. R., Hartman, T. E., Miller, R. R., & Muller, N. L. (1994). MRI of infiltrative lung disease: Comparison with pathologic findings. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, 18(2), 233-238.

MRI of infiltrative lung disease : Comparison with pathologic findings. / Primack, S. L.; Mayo, J. R.; Hartman, T. E.; Miller, R. R.; Muller, N. L.

In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1994, p. 233-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Primack, SL, Mayo, JR, Hartman, TE, Miller, RR & Muller, NL 1994, 'MRI of infiltrative lung disease: Comparison with pathologic findings', Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 233-238.
Primack SL, Mayo JR, Hartman TE, Miller RR, Muller NL. MRI of infiltrative lung disease: Comparison with pathologic findings. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1994;18(2):233-238.
Primack, S. L. ; Mayo, J. R. ; Hartman, T. E. ; Miller, R. R. ; Muller, N. L. / MRI of infiltrative lung disease : Comparison with pathologic findings. In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1994 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 233-238.
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