Motor and memory testing of long-lived pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A knock-out mice

Emily J. Mason, Jacquelyn A. Grell, Sally A. West, Cheryl A Conover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mice deficient in pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), an IGF binding protein protease, have been shown to be resistant to experimentally induced atherosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy, and, in the laboratory environment, live 30-40% longer than wild-type littermates in association with delayed incidence and occurrence of age-related neoplasms and degenerative diseases. Objective: PAPP-A is highly expressed in the cerebellum and hippocampus of the mouse brain. Therefore, the studies presented here were aimed at determining motor behavior, learning and retention in PAPP-A knock-out (KO) mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates with age. Design: Balance and coordination were assessed using an accelerating rotarod; learning and memory were assessed in a Stone T-maze. Results: Time on the rotarod decreased with age but there was no significant difference between PAPP-A KO and WT mice at any of the testing ages. Latency to reach the goal box and number of errors committed in the Stone T-maze did not change with age and there were no significant differences between PAPP-A KO and WT mice. Conclusion: Lack of PAPP-A in mice did not impact central regulation of coordination, learning or memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-255
Number of pages5
JournalGrowth Hormone and IGF Research
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A
Knockout Mice
Learning
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
Diabetic Nephropathies
Cerebellum
Hippocampus
Atherosclerosis
Peptide Hydrolases
Incidence
Brain

Keywords

  • Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A
  • Rotarod
  • Stone T-maze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Motor and memory testing of long-lived pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A knock-out mice. / Mason, Emily J.; Grell, Jacquelyn A.; West, Sally A.; Conover, Cheryl A.

In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.12.2014, p. 251-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mason, Emily J. ; Grell, Jacquelyn A. ; West, Sally A. ; Conover, Cheryl A. / Motor and memory testing of long-lived pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A knock-out mice. In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 251-255.
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