Motivation, Perception, and Treatment Beliefs in the Myocardial Infarction Genes (MI-GENES) Randomized Clinical Trial

Sharma Kattel, Tochukwu Onyekwelu, Sherry Ann Brown, Hayan Jouni, Erin Austin, Iftikhar Jan Kullo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about individuals’ motivation, perception, and treatment beliefs towards the use of genetic information in risk estimates for coronary heart disease (CHD). In this study, participants at intermediate 10-year risk of CHD were randomized to receive either their estimated conventional risk score (CRS) alone, or a CRS and a genetic risk score (GRS), by a genetic counselor. Surveys on motivation to participate in and perception of genetic testing for CHD were administered at 3 months and treatment beliefs at 6 months following risk disclosure. Survey responses used Likert scales. Linear and logistic regression were used for analysis. Overall, motivation to participate in genomic clinical trials was favorable and did not differ between the CRS and GRS groups (16.95 ± 0.82 vs. 17.58 ± 0.83, p = 0.091), but participants who initially received their GRS indicated a greater desire to find ways to improve health as a reason for participation (OR: 0.53 (95%CI: 0.29, 0.94), p = 0.028). Perception of genetic testing was also favorable in both groups (15.29 ± 0.39 vs. 15.12 ± 0.40, p = 0.835). Participants who initially received their GRS were more inclined to recommend genetic testing to family and friends (9.95 ± 1.88 vs. 10.52 ± 2.17, p = 0.023). In the MI-GENES study, motivation to participate in and perception of genetic testing among study participants were overall favorable. Genetic risk disclosure was associated with increased motivation to recommend genetic testing to family and friends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 6 2017

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Genetic risk disclosure
  • Genomic medicine
  • Motivation
  • Perception
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Treatment beliefs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Motivation, Perception, and Treatment Beliefs in the Myocardial Infarction Genes (MI-GENES) Randomized Clinical Trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this