Monosomal karyotype predicts adverse prognosis in patients diagnosed with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A single-institution experience

Aysha Alsahlawi, Hassan Alkhateeb, Mrinal Patnaik, Kebede Begna, Michelle Elliott, William J. Hogan, Mark Litzow, Aref Al-Kali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Cytogenetic abnormalities have a significant prognostic effect in many hematologic neoplasms. Monosomal karyotype (MK), a newly recognized cytogenetic category, has been reported to be a marker of poor prognosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and myelofibrosis, but its effect in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) remains relatively unknown. Patients and Methods A retrospective study of cases diagnosed with CMML found a total of 262 patients. Patient characteristics, cytogenetic data, and survival were analyzed. Results Cytogenetic analysis found diploidy in 167 patients (64%). Trisomy 8 was the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality at 8% (22), followed by complex karyotype (CK) at 5% (14), -7 at 4% (10), and MK at 3% (7, of which 6 [86%] were also CK). Median overall survival was statistically significantly worse in MK-positive cases than in MK-negative cases (MK+ vs. MK-). Patients with MK+ only or CK+MK+ did worse than any other group. Conclusion MK is a rare entity but can predict statistically significantly shorter overall survival among all other cytogenetic categories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e39-e41
JournalClinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Keywords

  • CMML
  • Cytogenetic analysis
  • MK
  • Prognosis
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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