Moderate physical activity as predictor of weight loss after bariatric surgery

Manpreet S. Mundi, Paul A. Lorentz, James Swain, Karen Grothe, Maria Collazo-Clavell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of obesity is 33 % and is expected to reach 50 % based on current US trends. Bariatric surgery is effective in producing long-term weight loss, yet it requires adherence to the recommended diet and physical activity. This study assessed whether the short-form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-SF) data at 1 year postbariatric surgery would correlate with success (defined as more than 50 % excess weight loss (EWL)) after surgery. Methods: The IPAQ-SF questionnaire provided assessment of subjects' activity level over the last 7 days, in four separate activity domains: vigorous, moderate, walking, and sitting. Results: Questionnaires were completed and collected at the 1-year postbariatric surgery group visit. Then, 118 subjects who completed the IPAQ-SF were subdivided based on loss of greater than or less than 50 % of their excess weight, which in turn was based on ideal body weight. In subjects with ≥50% EWL (n = 49), we noted 67.1 ± 8.8 % EWL versus 33.2 ± 9.4 % in those with <50 % EWL (n = 69) (p < 0.001). The ≥50 % EWL group performed 420 (216-960) min of total activity per week versus 300 (172-718) min for the <50 % group. The ≥50 % EWL group engaged in 120 (8-180) min of vigorous activity, 150 (28-330) min of moderate activity, and 233 (109-512) min of walking versus 40 (0-255), 68 (0-204), and 188 (83-341) min, respectively, for the <50 % EWL group. Conclusions: Physical activity does correlate with success after bariatric surgery, as measured by excess weight loss (≥50 % EWL).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1645-1649
Number of pages5
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Bariatric surgery
  • IPAQ
  • IPAQ-SF
  • Physical activity
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this